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A Study in Greene: Graham Greene and the Art of the Novel

By Bernard Bergonzi | Go to book overview

PREFACE

GRAHAM GREENE was a writer whose books continue to enjoy a wide readership whilst also regularly featuring in university courses. In this study I aim in the first place at general readers, in the hope that what makes sense to them will also make sense in the academy; at the same time, I pursue the critical questions that recur in academic discussions of Greene. I am assuming that readers will be familiar with the novels I discuss, and I provide only brief reminders of what goes on in them rather than detailed plot summaries. As this book is an essay rather than a thesis the scholarly apparatus is fairly light but, I hope, sufficient. Greene's books exist in a variety of editions on both sides of the Atlantic, which makes it impractical to provide sources for the many brief quotations from them. But where the quotations are long enough to be set separately I have inserted a parenthetical reference to the chapter and section of the book in which they appear. Greene's comments on his own work come from his Ways of Escape unless otherwise indicated. Short stories that I refer to can be found in his Collected Stories and essays in the Collected Essays. I quote Greene's film reviews from The Pleasure Dome: The Collected Film Reviews 1935-40, published in 1972, since it is a book I possess, but his writing on and for the cinema is more fully represented in Mornings in the Dark: The Graham Greene Film Reader, which came out in 1993, though it lacks the illustrations in the earlier book.

I append a list of Greene's books, indicating the dates and order of publication, but I do not supply a detailed bibliography; secondary material that I have drawn on or referred to is listed in the notes. Grateful acknowledgements are due to editors who over the years

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