Public Health Practice in Australia: The Organised Effort

By Vivian Lin; James Smith et al. | Go to book overview

Appendix D

Ottawa Charter for Health Promotion,
1986 (extract)

Health Promotion Action Areas:

Build Healthy Public Policy

Health promotion policy combines diverse but
complementary approaches including legislation,
fiscal measures, taxation and organizational change.
It is coordinated action that leads to health, income
and social policies that foster greater equity. Joint
action contributes to ensuring safer and healthier
goods and services, healthier public services, and
cleaner, more enjoyable environments.


Create Supportive Environments

The inextricable links between people and their envi-
ronment constitutes the basis for a socio-ecological
approach to health. The overall guiding principle for
the world, nations, regions and communities alike, is
the need to encourage reciprocal maintenance—to
take care of each other, our communities and our
natural environment. The conservation of natural
resources throughout the world should be empha-
sized as a global responsibility.

Changing patterns of life, work and leisure have a
significant impact on health. Work and leisure should
be a source of health for people. The way society
organizes work should help create a healthy society.
Health promotion generates living and working condi-
tions that are safe, stimulating, satisfying and
enjoyable.

Systematic assessment of the health impact of a
rapidly changing environment—particularly in areas of
technology, work, energy production and urbaniza-
tion—is essential and must be followed by action to
ensure positive benefit to the health of the public.


Strengthen Community Actions

Health promotion works through concrete and effec-
tive community action in setting priorities, making
decisions, planning strategies and implementing
them to achieve better health. At the heart of this
process is the empowerment of communities—their
ownership and control of their own endeavours and
destinies.

Community development draws on existing
human and material resources in the community to
enhance self-help and social support, and to develop
flexible systems for strengthening public participation
in and direction of health matters.


Develop Personal Skills

Health promotion supports personal and social devel-
opment through providing information, education
for health, and enhancing life skills. By so doing, it
increases the options available to people to exercise
more control over their own health and over their
environments, and to make choices conducive to
health.

Enabling people to learn, throughout life, to
prepare themselves for all of its stages and to cope
with chronic illness and injuries is essential. This has

-424-

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