Bob Dylan and Philosophy: It's Alright, Ma (I'm Only Thinking)

By Peter Vernezze; Carl J. Porter | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

We love Bob Dylan's work and we love philosophy. When we first conceived the project for this book, we were concerned that we might not be able to do justice to Dylan and at the same time do justice to philosophy, but as the volume took shape, we were first relieved, and then exultant. We are above all grateful to the authors of these chapters. For combining their passion for Dylan with their knowledge of philosophy, they deserve a standing ovation. The term “labor of love” is doubtless overused, but we can think of no better phrase to describe their efforts.

But the book would never have seen the light of day without the support of the immaculately frightful David Ramsay Steele at Open Court. It has also greatly benefited from the numerous suggestions and careful nurturing of Bill Irwin.

Jeff Rosen's office, in particular his assistant Lynne Okin Sheridan, could not possibly have been more helpful in facilitating our securing permission to quote Dylan's lyrics. May they stay forever young. 0eff and Lynne, we mean, not the lyrics, which we all know are much younger now than ever.) We'd like to thank Carol Olson, James Stewart, and Dave Truncillito for helping to get the volume off the ground. Our colleagues at Weber State University were indispensable in the process. A special thanks to Richard Greene and Mikel Vause. Claire Hughes and Ashley Remkes provided editorial and secretarial assistance. Others who deserve special mention include: Pamela Hall, Robert and Ann Jensen, Jim and Norma Porter, Tricia Porter, Michael Schumacher, Craig Smith, Chris Swartz, and Mary Vernezze.

Material from the following has been reproduced by gracious courtesy of Special Rider Music. All rights reserved. International copyright preserved. Reprinted by permission.

Absolutely Sweet Marie. Copyright © 1966 by Dwarf Music; renewed 1994 by Dwarf Music.

-xii-

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