Bob Dylan and Philosophy: It's Alright, Ma (I'm Only Thinking)

By Peter Vernezze; Carl J. Porter | Go to book overview

ALSO FROM OPEN COURT
Hip Hop and Philosophy
Rhyme 2 Reason

VOLUME 16 IN THE OPEN COURT SERIES
POPULAR CULTURE AND PHILOSOPHY

Should we stop all the violence in hip hop? Does po-po wield legit
authority in the hood? Where does the real Kimberly Jones end and
the persona Lil' Kim begin? Is hip-hop culture a “black” thang? Is it
unethical for N.W.A.to call themselves niggaz and for Dave Chapelle
to call everybody bitches? Is Dead Prez revolutionary and gangsta?

Yes, KRS-One and BDP, the crew assembled here are philoso-
phers! They show and prove that rap classics by Lauryn Hill, OutKast,
and the Notorious B.I.G. can help us uncover the meaning of love
articulated in Plato's Symposium. We see how Run-D.M.C, Snoop
Dogg, and Jay-Z can teach us about self-consciousness and the
dialectic in Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit. And we learn that
Raskin, 2Pac, and 50 Cent knowledge us on the conception of God's
essence expressed in Aquinas's Summa Theologica.

“Derrick Darby and Tommie Shelby… dare to support the claim
that hip hop is a legitimate worldview, primed to redefine what
it means to be one with the world.”

MARK ANTHONY NEAL
author of New Black Man

“Step aside Socrates, Kant, and Sartre—new seekers of philosophical
wisdom are on the scene… Big props to Derrick Darby, Tommie
Shelby, and their philosophical crew for maintaining existential and
ontological authenticity, aka keeping it real, in bringing us their
message. Word up!”

CHARLES W. MILLS
author of The Racial Contract

AVAILABLE FROM LOCAL BOOKSTORES OR
BY CALLING 1–800-815–2280

For more information on Open Court books, go to
www.opencourtbooks. com

-206-

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