Star Wars and Philosophy: More Powerful Than You Can Possibly Imagine

By Kevin S. Decker; Jason T. Eberl | Go to book overview

Masters of the Jedi Council

JEROLD J. ABRAMS is Director of the Program in Health Administration and Policy, and Assistant Professor of Business Ethics at Creighton University. He has published several essays on semiotics, ethics, and continental philosophy. It's true that he's getting older, and his skin is getting greener. But when nine hundred years old you reach, look as good you will not. Hm?

ROBERT ARP received a Ph.D. in philosophy from Saint Louis University. He has published articles in philosophy of mind, ancient philosophy, modern philosophy, phenomenology, and philosophy of religion. He's calculated that his chances of successfully making any money doing philosophy are approximately 3,720 to one against.

JUDY BARAD is Professor of Philosophy at Indiana State University. She has published several books, including The Ethics of Star Trek, and is currently completing Michael Moore: The American Socrates. In addition to teaching courses in ancient and medieval philosophy, she teaches a course on philosophy and Star Trek. She uses both mind melding and Jedi mind tricks to move back and forth between the Star Trek and Star Wars worlds.

CHRISTOPHER M. BROWN is Assistant Professor of Philosophy at the University of Tennessee at Martin. He has published in metaphysics and medieval philosophy and teaches courses in metaphysics, ethics, the philosophy of religion, and the history of philosophy. Inspired by Obi-Wan Kenobi, and fearing that Western civilization as we know it is soon coming to an end, he has found a safe place in northwest Tennessee to hide out with his family until "a new hope" arises.

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