The Philosophy of Human Nature

By Howard P. Kainz | Go to book overview

5
The Future of Human
Evolution

The human race has always been in progress toward the better and
will continue to be so henceforth. To him who does not consider
what happens in just some one nation but also has regard to the
whole scope of all the peoples on earth who will gradually come
to participate in progress, this reveals the prospect of an immeas-
urable time—provided at least that there does not, by some
chance, occur a second epoch of natural revolution which will
push aside the human race to clear the stage for other creatures.
… Gradually violence on the part of the powers will diminish and
obedience to the laws will increase. There will arise in the body
politic perhaps more charity and less strife in lawsuits, more relia-
bility in keeping one's word, etc., partly out of love of honor,
partly out of well-understood self-interest. And eventually this will
also extend to nations in their external relations toward one
another up to the realization of the cosmopolitan society, without
the moral foundation in mankind having to be enlarged in the
least; for that, a kind of new creation (supernatural influence)
would be necessary.

—IMMANUEL KANT, An Old Question Raised Again: Is the
Human Race Constantly Progressing?

A new anthropological space, the knowledge space, is being
formed today, which could easily take precedence over the spaces
of earth, territory, and commerce that preceded it.… The most
socially useful goal will no doubt be to supply ourselves with the
instruments for sharing our mental abilities in the construction of

-65-

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The Philosophy of Human Nature
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Foreword ix
  • Introduction xiii
  • 1: The [Difference Question] 1
  • 2: Are There Any Distinctively Human Instincts? 15
  • 3: Can Personality Traits and Intelligence Be Inherited? 27
  • 4: Are There Any Significant Sex-Related Personality Charactersitics? 47
  • 5: The Future of Human Evolution 65
  • 6: Is Human Nature a Unity or a Duality? 81
  • 7: Human Freedom 93
  • 8: Human Development 105
  • 9: Maturity 117
  • 10: The Nature of Love 127
  • 11: Philosophy and the Paranormal 137
  • 12: Survival After Death 151
  • Epilogue - Solutions Fitting Problems 167
  • Selected Bibliography 171
  • Index 179
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