Psychology for Musicians: Understanding and Acquiring the Skills

By Andreas C. Lehmann; John A. Sloboda et al. | Go to book overview

8
Managing Performance Anxiety

Most musicians choose their line of work based on a love of music and a desire to share it with others. Considering only this, one might believe that musicians enthusiastically welcome all opportunities to perform for people. Alas, this is not always the case. Being a performing musician involves pressures of different kinds. Often the greatest stress is felt when musicians take the stage to perform. Instead of sensing excitement in sharing their music with an audience, they feel apprehension and distress. This anxiety, commonly called “stage fright,” is a serious and debilitating performance problem for many musicians.

Unfortunately, performance anxiety may start early in the lives of musicians. Although parents and teachers provide children with the encouragement and assistance they need to develop as music students, they can also place such an emphasis on achievement that their young musicians feel pressured. Research has shown that adolescent musicians share the same experiences of performance anxiety as older performers (LeBlanc, Jin, Obert & Siivola, 1997), and we can assume that even younger musicians are susceptible to it when thrust into adult-like performing situations. In a survey of junior high and high school music students, roughly 55% of them reported having suffered from performance anxiety (Shoup, 1995).

Similar incidence is found in adult populations. Based on research, we estimate that around half of all performing musicians are affected to some degree by performance anxiety. Wesner, Noyes, and Davis (1990) found that 61% of students and faculty at an American school of music reported either “marked” or “moderate” distress when performing and that 47% blamed anxiety for their impaired performances. A survey of professional orchestra members showed 59% reporting past incidents of performance anxiety (Van Kemanade, Van Son, & Van Heesch, 1995). Other research has suggested that this problem is prevalent

-145-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Psychology for Musicians: Understanding and Acquiring the Skills
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents ix
  • Part I - Musical Learning 3
  • 1: Science and Musical Skills 5
  • 2: Development 25
  • 3: Motivation 44
  • 4: Practice 61
  • Part II - Musical Skills 83
  • 5: Expression and Interpretation 85
  • 6: Reading or Listening and Remembering 107
  • 7: Composition and Improvisation 127
  • 8: Managing Performance Anxiety 145
  • Part III - Musical Roles 163
  • 9: The Performer 165
  • 10: The Teacher 185
  • 11: The Listener 205
  • 12: The User 224
  • References 243
  • Index 265
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 268

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.