Psychology for Musicians: Understanding and Acquiring the Skills

By Andreas C. Lehmann; John A. Sloboda et al. | Go to book overview

Index
ability
versus competence, 36
as innate, 41
testing of, 36, 38, 110
statistical distribution of, 17
See also talent
absolute pitch, 38
affect. See expression; emotion in listening
amusia, 30, 222
anxiety
description of, 145
lack of, 156
reasons for, 153, 155, 160
symptoms of, 146
and task demands, 159
treating, 150, 154, 157, 158, 161
as a trait, 152
aptitude. See ability
automaticity, 79, 103, 117, 134, 137
brain
and ability, 36
activation in imaging music, 20
changes in response to training, 36, 69, 222
and emotion in listening, 221
See also amusia
capacity. See ability
chills, 219. See also peak experience
chunking, 111, 116, 118, 122. See also memory
classical culture
instruments of, 238
vs. nonclassical culture, 235
setting of, 237
colors and hearing. See synesthesia
common sense, 7
competence, 36. See also ability
composition
attention during, 132
contrasted with improvisation, 129
intention of, 238
learning, 137, 141
by a paranormal medium, 138
concerts
audience expectations, 120, 153, 167, 216
culture, 155, 169, 171, 224, 235
conducting, 198. See also rehearsal
creativity
and age, 140
and altered states, 137
development of, 137
in everyday life, 127
theories of, 133, 140
types of, 127
cross-cultural aspects, 15. See also non-Western music
development
of musical abilities, 141
normal path, 31
stages of, 31
of rhythm representations, 110

-265-

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Psychology for Musicians: Understanding and Acquiring the Skills
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents ix
  • Part I - Musical Learning 3
  • 1: Science and Musical Skills 5
  • 2: Development 25
  • 3: Motivation 44
  • 4: Practice 61
  • Part II - Musical Skills 83
  • 5: Expression and Interpretation 85
  • 6: Reading or Listening and Remembering 107
  • 7: Composition and Improvisation 127
  • 8: Managing Performance Anxiety 145
  • Part III - Musical Roles 163
  • 9: The Performer 165
  • 10: The Teacher 185
  • 11: The Listener 205
  • 12: The User 224
  • References 243
  • Index 265
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