PART ONE
Nevada and the Klamath Drainage

The first part of this volume will discuss the genesis of the 1870 Ghost Dance among the Paviotso and its course along the Klamath drainage among tribes of southeastern Oregon and northernmost California. This region represents a self-contained area in respect to the Ghost Dance. The cult did not pass from the Klamath drainage into central California. Furthermore, this area is characterized by only a brief persistence of the doctrine. An exception must be made for the Shasta and Klamath, whose cultures were more disintegrated than those of other tribes in the region. The Shasta proved to be a corridor for the transmission of cult movements from the Sacramento Valley to coastal Oregon.


Paviotso

Information concerning the earlier Ghost Dance elicited from the Pavi- otso in the vicinity of Walker Lake, Reno, and Pyramid Lake was almost of necessity couched in terms of the 1890 Ghost Dance. This was due to the death of Jack Wilson in October 1932, only some ten days before field work was begun, and to the more vivid impression left by the later prophet. Whether or not informants were adherents of Jack Wilson, they were all agreed that his doctrine was neither new nor unique, but that it was simply one expression of a recurring native pattern. The impression was gotten that in almost every generation shamans arose who preached the imminent return of the dead and in addition were capable of performing miracles, among which weather control was a favorite. Actually, however, no specific biographical material antedating approximately 1870 was ob- tained. Dr. Willard Park, on the other hand, has gained the impression in the course of recent ethnographic field work among the Paviotso that the doctrine of the return of the dead in large numbers was new with the 1870 and the 1890 prophets. He believes that the old element in the area was the resurrection of particular individuals by certain rare and outstanding

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