Notes

Abbreviations
AAAmerican Anthropologist
JAFLJournal of American Folk-Lore
UC-PAAEUniversity of California Publications in American Archaeology and Ethnology

Introduction

1. "Wintun" is used throughout this paper for the group known in the older literature as Central Wintun or Nomlaki. The Northern Wintun are called "Wintu," and the Southern Wintun are designated as "Patwin."

2. A. H. Gayton, "The Ghost Dance of 1870 in South-Central California," UC- PAAE 28 (1930): 57–82.


1. Nevada and the Klamath Drainage

1. For the Paviotso of Owens Valley, Julian Steward says: "Ghosts of the dead, appearing and talking to the people, at night, were the only clearly conceived spirits" ("The Ethnography of the Owens Valley Paiute," UC-PAAE 33 "1933": 307).

2. James Mooney, "The Ghost Dance Religion and the Sioux Outbreak of 1890," Fourteenth Annual Report of the Bureau of American Ethnology, Part 2 (1896): 701–4.

3. Ibid., 701.

4. This date given by Mooney, "Ghost Dance Religion," 764. N. P. Phister ("The Indian Messiah," AA, o.s., 4 "1891": 105, 106) also identifies the earlier prophet as Jack Wilson's father, but he gives no name. He dates the first preaching in 1869.

5. Park reports that his Paviotso name was Pongi and that the name Weneyuga was bestowed on him by the Washo from the last word in his song, wunu'ga puniu ("sound of the wind"). However, Frank Spencer is known throughout the area of his proselytizing efforts as Weneyuga or some variant thereof.

6. This idea that believers in the adventist doctrine died sooner than skeptics

-335-

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The 1870 Ghost Dance
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Illustrations viii
  • Introduction to the Nebraska Edition ix
  • Preface xxv
  • Introduction 1
  • Part One: Nevada and the Klamath Drainage 5
  • Part Two: Western Oregon 57
  • Part Three: North-Central California 89
  • Part Four: Big Head Cult 271
  • Summary of Chronology 297
  • Summary of Contents 301
  • Conclusions and Speculations 313
  • Appendix ° Informants 323
  • Notes 335
  • Index 351
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