1. Between the Volcano and the Sea, 1794–1810

Santa Anna must have known he stood a good chance of facing a firing squad later that month, as the chief prosecutor's words reverberated around the packed theater of Veracruz. The Zapotec constitutional president and iron-willed leader of the Liberals, lawyer Benito Juárez, was determined to exterminate anyone who stood in the way of his reformist project. He had shown no mercy toward the three iconic Conservatives who were executed outside Querétaro, on the Cerro de las Campanas, at dawn on 19 June. Letters had flooded in from Europe begging him to spare Maximilian's life. Juárez would have none of it. It did not matter that Maximilian was an Austrian prince or that the 1857 Constitution banned the death penalty for political offenses. Maximilian was tried by court-martial under the harsh law of 25 January 1862, found guilty of attacking the nation, and shot dead.

Juárez wanted the world to know that this was the fate that awaited those European imperialist adventurers who dared intervene in Mexico. He also wanted Mexicans to know that he was not prepared to spare the lives of those nationals who dared take up arms against his Liberal republic. Miguel Miramón, the dashing Conservative general who returned to Mexico to assist Maximilian in his hour of reckoning, knowing that his was a lost cause, and Juárez's Indian nemesis, the ultraCatholic nationalist Otomí general Tomás Mejía, both faced the firing squad alongside the ill-starred Habsburg archduke-cum-emperor of Mexico. What chance did Santa Anna have of escaping the death penalty when such eminent men had all been tried and killed?

On 8 October 1867, it was the turn of the accused to make his case. A

-3-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Santa Anna of Mexico
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 501

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.