The Art of Teaching Spanish: Second Language Acquisition from Research to Praxis

By Rafael Salaberry; Barbara A. Lafford | Go to book overview

CONTRIBUTORS

Gwendolyn Barnes-Karol (Ph.D., University of Minnesota) is professor of Spanish at St. Olaf College, where she teaches language, literature, and culture as well as courses through St. Olaf's FLAC program. Her recent research in the ADFL Bulletin focuses on the curricular and pedagogical implications of how undergraduate readers process book-length literary texts in a foreign language.

Robert Blake (Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin), professor of Spanish at the University of California at Davis and director of the UC Language Consortium, publishes in Spanish linguistics, SLA, and CALL. He has helped author software such as Nuevos Destinos, Tesoros, Spanish Without Walls, and Arabic Without Walls. He was recently inducted into the North American Academy for the Spanish Language.

Andrew D. Cohen (Ph.D., Stanford University) is professor of applied linguistics at the University of Minnesota. He has published books and articles on language assessment, learner strategies, pragmatics, and research methods. He is currently coediting Language Learner Strategies: Thirty Years of Research and Practice (Oxford University Press).

Sonia Colina (Ph.D., University of Illinois) is associate professor of Spanish linguistics and translation at University of Arizona, where she also directs the Spanish Translation Certificate Program. Her research areas include translation pedagogy and linguistic aspects of translation. She is the author of Translation Teaching: From Research to the Classroom (McGraw-Hill, 2003) and of studies in numerous publications, including Target, the Translator, and Babel.

Joseph Collentine (Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin) is associate professor of Spanish and associate dean in the College of Arts and Letters at Northern Arizona University. His research interests include the acquisition of the subjunctive by classroom based learners, developmental issues related to study abroad, and computerassisted language learning. He is currently the associate editor for applied linguistics for the journal Hispania.

Ann Marie Delforge is a doctoral candidate in Spanish linguistics at the University of California at Davis. Her primary research areas are Spanish phonology and phonetics, but she is also very interested in the use of technology in foreign language teaching.

Marta Fairclough (Ph.D., University of Houston) is assistant professor of Spanish linguistics and director of Spanish Undergraduate Studies at the University of Houston. She specializes in heritage language education, language acquisition, and sociolinguistics with an emphasis on U.S. Spanish. She is the author of Spanish and Heritage Language Education in the United States: Struggling with Hypotheticals (Iberoamericana, 2005).

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