The Art of Teaching Spanish: Second Language Acquisition from Research to Praxis

By Rafael Salaberry; Barbara A. Lafford | Go to book overview

INDEX
acquisition-learning distinction, applied to translator training, 214
ACTFL. See American Council for the Teaching of Foreign Languages
ACTFL-OPI test. See also American Council for the Teaching of Foreign Languages
assessing translation proficiency with, 223
development of, 154
testing pragmatic knowledge, 160
activities
benefits of task-based, 41
influence of constructivist tenets on computerassisted language learner, 41–42
internalizing complex concept through verbalization, 86
for practice-oriented translation and interpretation modules/programs, 228
toward achieving translational competence, 226
American Council for the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL)
analyzing guidelines of, 164–65
OPI test, 154, 160, 223
apodoses, patterns of verb forms in, 178–80
assessment. See also tests
benefits of including innovative, 156–57
formative vs. summative, 158
need to develop procedures for heritage learners, 201–4
for translation proficiency, 222–23
for usefulness and relevance of tests, 149–50
authenticity, assessing test, 150
Barnes-Karol, Gwendolyn, 23–38, 235
bilingual range, expanding heritage learners', 196–97
Blake, Robert, 127–47, 235
CALL. See computer-assisted language learning
CARLA. See Center for Advanced Research on Language Acquisition
CBI. See concept-based instruction
CBI. See content-based instruction
Center for Advanced Research on Language Acquisition (CARLA), assessing speaking, 155
Center for International Education, Department of Education, development of FLAC, 23
chat tools, using for pronunciation correction, 142–43
classroom practices
applying study abroad and study abroad-athome research to, 120–21
challenges of applying SLA research to translation, 224–27
impact of tests on, 158–59
incorporating linguistic variation into, 184–86
influence of constructivism on, 39–42
influence of psycholinguistics and cognition on, 42–47
influence of social and sociocultural cognition on, 47–48
recommendations for testing, 165–68
role of input in, 59
teaching nonstandard dialects in, 180–82
using input flood in, 61–63
using input/output cycles in, 63–65
using recasts in, 70–72
using structured input in, 65–70
using text enhancement in, 59–61
clitics, research on effects of study abroad on, 107
cloze testing format, 152
CMC. See computer-mediated communication
cognition
effects of study abroad on, 109
emotion interacting with, 151
influence on curriculum design and classroom practice, 42–47
cognitive code method
illustrating objectivism, 39
rejection of, 42
Cohen, Andrew D., 149–72, 235
Colina, Sonia, 213–34, 235
Collentine, Joseph, 39–54, 103–26, 235
communication
effects of study abroad on, 107–8
importance of dialect knowledge to, 174–75
introducing variation into classrooms with activities, 184–85
linking grammar concepts to, 82
communication strategies
effects of study abroad on, 108
in language acquisition, 46–47
communicative ability
applied to translator training, 214–15
models of, 150–52
communicative approaches, applied to translation education, 215
communicative modes, heritage learners developing, 196–97
complex linguistic constructions
interventions for, 45
preterit/imperfect distinction, 45–46
step-by-step acquisition of, 46
using didactic models to capture concept of, 84–86
using verbalization activities to internalize, 86
computer-assisted language learning (CALL)
improving efficacy of online courses, 127
influence of constructivist tenets on activities of, 41–42
value to Spanish Without Walls program, 128
computer-mediated communication (CMC)
benefits of to Spanish Without Walls program, 128–29
improving efficacy of online courses, 127
concept-based instruction (CBI)
creating didactic models for, 84–86
Negueruela's study involving, 86–97
supporting explicit instruction in grammar, 82
systemic-theoretical instruction approach to, 81–82

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