Analyzing the Grammar of English

By Richard V. Teschner; Eston E. Evans | Go to book overview

Chapter 2
Verbs, Tenses, Forms, and Functions

Conjugating a Verb

An LV can be conjugated, adding the morphemes /ing/, /d/, and /z/ to mark, respectively, gerund/present participle, past tense/past participle, and third person singular present tense.1


REGULAR VERBS

Approximately 98 percent of all English verbs are morphologically regular (regular in terms of their forms). All English regular verbs have just four forms: the LV base form, the -s, the -ed, and the -ing. The LV base is used throughout the present tense except in 3.sg. (third person singular); the LV base is also used as the imperative, it appears as the second word in the future and the conditional tenses, and it makes up the second word in modal constructions. When preceded by to, the LV base form is used as the infinitive, widely employed in complementizing clauses (see chapter 8). The morphology of the forms -(e)s (3.sg. present tense) and -(e)d (simple past and past participle) has already been discussed in chapter 1. The /ing/ form constitutes the present participle. Examples of all the four forms of a regular verb (a four-form verb having no vowel or consonant changes whatsoever) follow just below:

process (LV base form)

to process (the infinitive): I want to process these applications I/you/we/they process (i.e., the 1.sg. [first person singular], 2.sg./2.pl., 1.pl., and 3.pl. present tense forms—all present tense forms that are not 3.sg.; see these below): We process applications daily

process (imperative = the command form): Process these applications right now!

will process (future tense): I will process five more applications tonight would process (conditional tense): I would process even more if I could might process (a modal construction [see chapter 4]): In time, I might process all the applications for the whole country

he/she/it processes (the third person singular present tense form): He processes applications for the fun of it. That new computer processes with incredible speed. (Note that any singular subject that is not first person—I—or second person—you—is automatically third person, a fact that emphasizes its great importance. The same is true in the plural: any person not first—we—or— second—you—is automatically third.)

processed (the past tense form and the past participle form):

-31-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Analyzing the Grammar of English
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 227

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.