Poor Banished Children of Eve: Woman as Evil in the Hebrew Bible

By Gale A. Yee | Go to book overview

5: Faithless Israel in Hosea:
She Is Not My Wife and I Am Not Her Husband

The prophet Hosea is credited as the originator of the (in)famous depiction of God as faithful husband to Israel, his faithless wife. Succeeding prophets—for example, Jeremiah, Ezekiel,1 and Malachi— adopt and enlarge upon this powerful and provocative but problematic metaphor. The marriage metaphor becomes an extraordinarily effective vehicle to communicate to and reinforce in the prophets' hearers the contours and demands of God's covenant with Israel: (1) that it is foremost an intimate, significant relationship; (2) that this relationship is between unequal parties, a dominant and a subordinate; (3) that it involves reciprocal commitments and responsibilities; and (4) that any violation by the subordinate of these commitments and responsibilities will result in punishment.2

That the marriage metaphor for God's covenant presents interpretive problems for modern readers is already well documented.3' In the first place, the metaphor conflates the deity and the human husband: God becomes an all-forgiving male. Significantly for the present study, the sinful is thus embodied in the vivid image of a defiant, lubricious wife. Woman becomes the very epitome of evil as an adulteress in heat. Furthermore, by envisioning God humiliating and physically punishing his wife to make her repent, the metaphor comes dangerously close to sanctioning a husband's domestic violence against his wife.

This chapter investigates the material and sociohistorical conditions that give rise to such a metaphor, one capturing the imaginations

-81-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Poor Banished Children of Eve: Woman as Evil in the Hebrew Bible
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Poor Banished Children of Eve i
  • More Praise - For Poor Banished Children of Eve ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Abbreviations vii
  • Preface xi
  • 1: Introduction 1
  • 2: Ideological Criticism and Woman as Evil 9
  • 3: The Social Sciences and the Biblical Woman as Evil 29
  • 4: Eve in Genesis 59
  • 5: Faithless Israel in Hosea She Is Not My Wife and I Am Not Her Husband 81
  • 6: The Two Sisters in Ezekiel 111
  • 7: The Other Women in Proverbs 135
  • 8: Conclusion 159
  • Notes 167
  • Bibliography 233
  • Index of Ancient Sources 271
  • Index of Authors 285
  • Index of Subjects 289
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 298

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.