Witnessing and Testifying: Black Women, Religion, and Civil Rights

By Rosetta E. Ross | Go to book overview

Notes

Chapter l: Religion and Public Life
1. For an exploration of the role of religious institutions as providing "safe space" in the lives of African Americans, see Peter Paris's discussion of the Black "surrogate world" in The Social Teaching of the Black Churches (Philadelphia: Fortress Press, 1985) and C. Eric Lincoln and Larry Mamiya's discussion of the "black sacred cosmos" in The Black Church in the African American Experience (Durham: Duke University Press, 1990).
2. See, for example, Taylor Branch, Parting the Waters: America in the King Years, 1954–1963 (New York: Simon & Schuster, 1988), and idem, Pillar of Fire: America in the King Years, 1963–1965 (New York: Simon & Schuster, 1998); David J. Garrow, Bearing the Cross: Martin Luther King, Jr. and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (New York: Vintage, 1988); Aldon Morris, The Origins of the Civil Rights Movement: Black Communities Organizing for Change (New York: Free Press, 1984); Belinda Robnett, How Long? How Long? African-American Women in the Struggle for Civil Rights (New York: Oxford University Press, 1997).
3. These works include Zita Allen, Black Women Leaders of the Civil Rights Movement (New York: Franklin Watts, 1996); Cynthia Griggs Fleming, Soon We Will Not Cry: The Liberation of Ruby Doris Smith Robinson (Lanham, Md.: Rowman and Littlefield, 1998); Joanne Grant, Ella Baker: Freedom Bound (New York: Wiley and Sons, 1998); Chana Kai Lee, For Freedom's Sake: The Life of Fannie Lou Hamer (Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1999); Robnett, How Long? How Long?; Bettye Collier-Thomas and V. P. Franklin, eds., Sisters in the Struggle: African American Women in the Civil Rights-Black Power Movement (New York: New York University Press, 2001); Lynne Olson, Freedom's Daughters: The Unsung Heroines of the Civil Rights Movement from 1830 to 1970 (New York: Scribner's, 2001); Constance Curry et al., Deep in Our Hearts: Nine White Women in the Freedom Movement (Athens: University of Georgia Press, 2000).
4. See Charles Marsh, God's Long Summer: Stories of Faith and Civil Rights (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1997). Marsh examines the

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