Acknowledgements

I am grateful to my colleagues in the Department of Media and Film at Sussex, especially Thomas Austin, Kate Lacey, Lizzie Thynne and Robbie Robb, for their support during the writing of this book. Thanks, too, go to Andrew Duff and especially to Helen Thornham, for their practical help, and to Sarah Edwards for her patience. Finally, special thanks go to Mike and Beth, who kept me going.

For permission to reproduce the illustrations in this book, I would like to thank:

Figure 2.1Rokeby Venus (1649) by Velasquez: the National Gallery Picture Library, with special thanks to Margaret Daly.
Figure 2.2Lady Lilith (1868) by Rossetti: Delaware Art Museum.
Figure 2.3Estée Lauder Youth Dew: Art & Commerce, with special thanks to Jessica Marx
Figure 2.4Special Κ cereal: the Kellogg Group, with special thanks to Ben Goodman.
Figure 2.5Snickers: Mars UK Limited, with special thanks to Dawn Palmer.
Figure 5.1Adidas boots: Adidas, with special thanks to Sarah Talbot.
Figure 5.2Wilkinson Sword: Wilkinson Sword and EMAP/FHM, with special thanks to Gerhild Freller

-vii-

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Women, Feminism and Media
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • List of Illustrations vi
  • Acknowledgements vii
  • 1: Introduction 1
  • 2: Fixing into Images 23
  • 3: Narrating Femininity 55
  • 4: Real Women 84
  • 5: Technologies of Difference 113
  • 6: Conclusion: Everyday Readings 145
  • Bibliography 152
  • Index 169
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