Miranda Law: The Right to Remain Silent

By Ron Fridell | Go to book overview

Bibliography

BOOKS

Baker, Liva. Miranda: Crime, Law, and Politics. New York: Atheneum, 1983.

Riley, Gail Blasser. Miranda v. Arizona: Rights of the Accused. Hillside, NJ: Enslow Publishers, 1994.


MIRANDA BRIEFS

ACLU: curiae.law.yale.edu/pdf/384-436/017.pdf

National District Attorneys Association: curiae.law.yale.edu/pdf/384-436/013.pdf

Respondent: curiae.law.yale.edu/pdf/384-436/013.pdf

Petitioner: curiae.law.yale.edu/pdf/384-436/008.pdf

FBIAA: www.law.utah.edu/faculty/websites/cassellp/fbibrief.html


MIRANDA RULING

laws.findlaw.com/us/384/436.html


RELATED CASES

Argersinger v. Hamlin, 407 U.S. 25 (1972).

Betts v. Brady, 3i6 U.S. 455 (1942).

Brown et al. v. State of Mississippi (1936).

Dickerson v. United States 530 U.S. 428 (2000).

-137-

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Miranda Law: The Right to Remain Silent
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Contents 5
  • One - The Miranda Rule 7
  • Two - You Have the Right to Remain Silent 18
  • Three - You Have the Right to Counsel 33
  • Four - Filling the Case 55
  • Five - The Oral Arguments 64
  • Six - The Ruling 77
  • Seven - Reactions to the Ruling 91
  • Eight - Exception and Extensions 97
  • Nine - Miranda is Challenged 107
  • Ten - Miranda Today 113
  • Notes 129
  • Further Information 135
  • Bibliography 137
  • Index 139
  • About the Author 144
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