Brown v. Board of Education: Separate but Equal?

By Susan Dudley Gold | Go to book overview

TWO
Civil War Legacy

THe SCHOOL DeseGreGaTion cases of the 1950s

and the injustices they revealed were rooted in the social upheaval of the previous century. The victory of the North in the Civil War freed the slaves and left white Southerners bitter and determined to regain power.

After the war, the federal government took control of the South. This period, known as Reconstruction, lasted from 1865 to 1877. Two factions in Congress vied for control during this period. The Radical Republicans wanted to make certain that the wealthy plantation owners of the old South did not win back control. They supported equal rights for black citizens and pushed for adoption of the Thirteenth Amendment, which abolished slavery. The Moderates' main goal was to restore the political rights of the Southern states. They cared far less about the plight of blacks in the South.

In 1865, the former Confederate states abolished slavery and, with the exception of Mississippi, ratified the Thirteenth Amendment. In exchange, President Andrew Johnson allowed the states to run their own affairs once again. White plantation owners, later pardoned by President Johnson, won election to local offices. The new state legislatures quickly enacted laws to keep black citizens from gaining power. Under these laws, called the black codes,

-19-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Brown v. Board of Education: Separate but Equal?
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Contents 5
  • One - A Girl and a Dream 7
  • Two - Civil War Legacy 19
  • Three - Separate but Not Equal 32
  • Four - Through the Court System 44
  • Five - To the Supreme Court 56
  • Six - A Momentous Decision 78
  • Seven - A New Day 92
  • Eight - Darkness and Light 109
  • Timeline 123
  • Notes 124
  • Further Information 130
  • Bibliography 133
  • Index 138
  • About the Author 143
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 144

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.