Brown v. Board of Education: Separate but Equal?

By Susan Dudley Gold | Go to book overview
TImeLine
1950Briggs v. Elliott filed in U.S. District Court
1951Boiling v. Sharpe heard in U.S. District Court
February 1951Oliver Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka filed in U.S. District Court for the District of Kansas
May 1951Briggs v. Elliott argued in U.S. District Court
May 1951Davis v. County School Board of Prince Edward County filed in U.S. District Court in Richmond
June 1951 District court rules against Briggs
June 1951 District court hears Brown case
July 1951Briggs case appealed to U.S. Supreme Court
August 1951 District court rules against Brown
September 1951Brown case appealed to U.S. Supreme Court
October 1951Belton v. Gebhart and Bulah v. Gebhart go to trial in Delaware Chancery Court
February 1952 District court hears Davis case
March 1952 District court rules in favor of school board in Davis case; Davis appeals to Supreme Court
April 1952 Delaware Chancery Court rules in favor of Belton and Bulah; orders white schools to desegregate
August 28, 1952 Delaware Supreme Court upholds Chancery Court ruling on Bulah and Belton; state appeals to Supreme Court
October 1952 Supreme Court joins Brown, Briggs, Davis, Belton, and Bulah cases and announces it will hear Boiling at same time
December 9–11, 1952 Supreme Court hears arguments in joined cases and Boiling
June 1953 Supreme Court schedules rearguments for October
September 1953 Supreme Court Chief Justice Frederick Vinson dies; Earl Warren nominated to fill post as Chief Justice
December 7–9, 1953Brown et al. reargued before Supreme Court
May 17, 1954 Supreme Court issues decisions in Brown, Boiling
October 1954 Justice Robert Jackson dies; John Marshall Harlan nominated to fill post
April 11–14, 1955 Brown cases reargued on how to integrate (Brown II)
May 31, 1955 Supreme Court issues decision in Brown II
September 4, 1957 First day of school for [Little Rock Nine] in Arkansas
November 14, 1960 First day of school for Ruby Bridges in New Orleans

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Brown v. Board of Education: Separate but Equal?
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Contents 5
  • One - A Girl and a Dream 7
  • Two - Civil War Legacy 19
  • Three - Separate but Not Equal 32
  • Four - Through the Court System 44
  • Five - To the Supreme Court 56
  • Six - A Momentous Decision 78
  • Seven - A New Day 92
  • Eight - Darkness and Light 109
  • Timeline 123
  • Notes 124
  • Further Information 130
  • Bibliography 133
  • Index 138
  • About the Author 143
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