The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia - Vol. 1

By Geoffrey W. Bromiley; Everett F. Harrison et al. | Go to book overview

c

CAB kab (2 Κ. 6:25, AV). See KAB; WEIGHTS AND MEASURES.

CABBON kāb'an "Heb. kabbôn; Gk. Chabra". A place in the Shephelah of Judah near Eglon (Josh. 15:40). Possibly it is to be identified with Hebra E of Lachish; it may be the same as MACHBENAH.

CABIN "Heb. anuyyôt" (Jer. 37:16, AV). Obsolete term for "cell," as it is rendered by the RSV

CABUL ka'bal "Heb. kābúl; Gk. Β Chōbamasomel, A Chabōl apó aristeron".

1. A city in the territory assigned to Asher following the conquest under Joshua (Josh. 19:27). Represented by modern Kabul, the hill town is located about 10 mi. (16 km.) ENE of Mt. Carmel, overlooking the maritime plain.

2. The name given by Hiram king of Tyre to a Galilean district containing twenty cities given to him by Solomon (1 K. 9:13). Cabul may have been the governing city of the district; or by popular etymology (kebal, "as old, as worn out"), Hiram was complaining about Solomon's gift when compared with the 120,000 talents of gold he had sent Solomon (1 K. 9:14). Present evidence does not locate this district with certainty. R. J. HUGHES, III

CADDIS kad'is (1 Mace. 2:2, AV). See GADDI 2.

CADES kā'dēz (1 Mace. 11:63. AV). See KEDESH 3.

CADES-BARNE kā'dēz bär'na; CADESH kā'desh; CADESH-BARNEA ka'desh bar'nē-ǝ. See KADESH 1.

CAESAR sē'zǝr "Gk. Kaisar". Originally the surname of the Julian gens (thus, Caius Julius Caesar); afterward a name borne by the Roman emperors. In the NT the name is definitely applied to Augustus (Lk. 2:1, "Caesar Augustus"), to whom it belonged by adoption, and to Tiberius (Lk. 3:1, "Tiberius Caesar"; cf. Mt. 22:17, 21). The "Caesar" to whom Paul appealed (Acts 25:1 If. 21) was Nero. The form is perpetuated in "Kaiser" and "Czar." See also ROMAN EMPIRE AND CHRISTIANITY I.

CAESAR, JULIUS jōō'lē-ǝs. See ROMAN EMPIRE AND CHRISTIANITY I.A.

CAESAREA ses-ǝ-rē'ǝ "Gk. Kaisar(e)ia". A city on the Palestinian coast about 23 mi. (37 km.) S of Mt. Carmel and about 65 mi. (105 km.) NW of Jerusalem. The ancient name in its Arabic form is still associated with the ruined site of Qeisâriyeh.

Caesarea was originally a Phoenician fortification or city known as Strata's tower, and seems to have been built in the 4th cent. B.C. by a Sidonian king of that name (Josephus Ant. xiii.15.4). During the Maccabean war it was captured from Zoilus by Alexander Janneus ca. 96 B.C. (Ant. xiii.12.4; 15.4). The city fell to the Roman forces under Pompey in 63 B.C., and was subsequently given to Herod the Great by Augustus (Ant. xv.7.3). Herod then named the city Caesarea and its seaport Sebastos, in honor of the Roman emperor (Ant. xvi.5.1).

In a display of lavishness Herod erected sumptuous palaces and public buildings over a twelve-year period: and it was not until 10 B.C. that construction was completed and the city dedicated amid magnificent games in the amphitheater.

The harbor at Caesarea was particularly noteworthy, because the whole coastline was inhospitable to shipping. Herod constructed a huge breakwater 200 ft. (60 m.) wide and about 120 ft. (37 m.) in depth, the enormous stones of which can still be seen extending some 150 ft. (46 m.) from the shore. Elaborate buildings surrounded part of the harbor, and there were statues of the emperor at the entrance. Not all of the site has been excavated, but work there has uncovered a synagogue dating from the 4th or 5th cent. A.D.

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