The Politics of Vision: Essays on Nineteenth-Century Art and Society

By Linda Nochlin | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

There are many people I would like to thank for their help, their criticism, and for their ideas and information. I believe that art history, like any scholarly discipline, is basically a communal enterprise, and that every new step is inextricably bound to pre-existing discourse, whether the intention is to continue in a previously established direction, to supersede it, or to contradict and displace it. Perversely, some of those who have been most helpful to me in formulating my own ideas are those with whom I most strongly--even violently--disagree; I find working against a particular conceptual position both anxiety-provoking and invigorating. Nevertheless, the people I am about to thank are mostly those with whom I am in general agreement. These include Eunice Lipton, Rosalyn Krauss, Douglas Crimp, Robert Herbert, Kirk Varnedoe, Miramar Benítez, Michel Melot, Pierre Georgel, Sarah Faunce, Beatrice Farwell, Albert Boime, Carol Zemel, Stephen Eisenman, Carol Duncan, Carol Ockman, Susan Rossen, Rosalyn Deutsche, and finally, Abigail Solomon-Godeau, who offered wise counsel in the preparation of the introduction. The exemplary intellectual courage and originality of British feminist scholars like Griselda Pollock, Lisa Tickner, Tamar Garb, and Kathleen Adler must be acknowledged with deep gratitude. I should like to make special mention of the unfailing support and tactful suggestions--one could hardly use so harsh a term as "criticism"--provided by Elizabeth Baker, my good friend of thirty years, and my editor for almost as long. I should

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