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The Politics of Vision: Essays on Nineteenth-Century Art and Society

By Linda Nochlin | Go to book overview
in her catalogue entry on Masked Ball at the Opera in Manet 1832- 1883 ( New York, 1983), no. 138, pp. 349-52. This catalogue entry is a rich source of information and documentation about the painting, as are Theodore Reff, Manet and Modern Paris ( Washington, D.C., 1982), no. 39, p. 122, and Denis Rouart and Daniel Wildenstein, Edouard Manet: Catalogue raisonné (Lausanne, 1975), I, no. 216. For another interpretation of the work see Alain de Leiris, "Manet and El Greco: The 'Opera Ball,'" Arts, September 1980, pp. 95-99. For studies of Manet Masked Ball published after the completion of this article, see Melissa Hall, "Manet's Ball at the Opera: A Matter of Response", Rutgers Art Review, Spring, 1984, and John Hutton, "The Clown at the Ball: Manet's Masked Ball at the Opera," The Oxford Art Journal 10:2 ( 1987):76-94. For the theme of the masked ball from the viewpoint of cultural history, see Ann Ilan-Alter, "Je te connais, beau masque . . ." ( Women, Sex and Class at the Bal de L'Opéra, 1830- 1873). Paper presented at the American Historical Association, December 1985.
2.
Julius Meier-Graefe, Edouard Manet ( Munich, 1912), p. 216. Meier-Graefe also maintained that the painting was "ein Stück, das ein Ganzes ergibt." His analysis of the work (pp. 215-18), though brief, is brilliant.
3.
Stéphane Mallarmé, "Le Jury de peinture pour 1874 et M. Manet," Oeuvres complètes, ed. H. Mondor and G. Jean-Aubry ( Paris, 1945), p. 695. The letter originally appeared in La Renaissance artistique et littéraire in 1874.
4.
Théodore Duret, Histoire d'Edouard Manet et son oeuvre, 2nd ed. ( Paris, 1919), p. 109.
5.
For related works see the oil sketches in Rouart-Wildenstein, I, nos. 214-15, and an ink-wash study, II, no. 503. There may be three or four related drawings as well. See de Leiris, The Drawings of Edouard Manet ( Berkeley and Los Angeles, 1969), nos. 412-15.
6.
Reff reproduces the relevant Grévin caricature in Manet and Modern Paris, fig. 62, p. 122.
7.
Roman Jakobson, "The Metaphoric and Metonymic Poles," Fundamentals of Language ( The Hague, 1956), pp. 76-82.
8.
T. Reff, "The Symbolism of Manet's Frontispiece Etchings," Burlington Magazine, May 1962, pp. 182-87.
9.
For the color lithograph, see Reff, Manet and Modern Paris, no. 40. For the watercolor study, see Rouart-Wildenstein II, no. 563; for the oil sketch, I, no. 212; and for the finished oil, I, no. 213.
10.
Cited by Jean C. Harris, "A Little-Known Essay on Manet by Stéphane Mallarmé," Art Bulletin, Dec. 1964, p. 561. Mallarmé essay had originally appeared in the English Art Monthly Review in 1876.
11.
See, for example, the caricature of the work of the photographer Disderi by Cham, from Le Charivari of 1861, reproduced by Aaron Scharf, Art and Photography ( London, 1968), fig. 144. p. 155, in which the legs of the passengers on an omnibus are amputated by the upper margin of the image.
12.
T. Reff, "Manet's 'Portrait of Zola,'" Burlington Magazine, Jan. 1975, p. 41.
13.
Duret, pp. 110-12.
14.
Cachin, p. 350. For images of Chabrier, see R. DeCage, "Chabrier et ses amis impressionistes", L'Oeil, Dec. 1963, pp. 16-23f.
15.
De Leiris, "Manet and El Greco," p. 98.

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