Paul and Jesus: The True Story

By David Wenham | Go to book overview

6: What is going on in Galatians?

Galatians is a red-hot letter, written with great passion and force. Having travelled in the previous chapter with Paul through Galatia and having tried to reconstruct the historical sequence of events from Acts and from Paul's letters, we now turn specifically to Galatians, to see what we can learn from the letter about Paul and his ministry. In the following chapter we will consider what we can deduce about his relationship with Jesus.


Paul's context and Paul's opponents

One of the intriguing questions when reading any of Paul's letters is: what led to the writing of this letter? Most of the letters are responses to particular situations, but it is not always easy to work out what those situations were. Scholars speak of a process of 'mirror-reading': we look into the letters, and try to see what situations are reflected whom Paul is speaking to or about. Others have said that it is like hearing one end of a phone conversation and trying to work out what the person at the other end is saying. It is not always an easy task, especially if the person on 'this end' is agitated.

However, we have already had plenty of clues about what was happening in Galatia, and some things are very clear from Paul's letter to the Galatians. Thus Paul usually begins his letters by giving thanks for people; he does this even with the wayward Corinthians (1 Corinthians 1.4). But with the Galatians there is no opening thanksgiving; instead Paul jumps straight in with a pained comment: 'I am astonished that you are so quickly deserting the one who called you by the grace of Christ and are turning to a different gospel which is really no gospel at all. Evidently, some people are throwing you into confusion and are trying to pervert the gospel of Christ' (1.6). Here is clear evidence that the Galatians are being led away from what Paul taught them and soon after his visit by people wanting to correct Paul's teaching. Paul goes on to say that he wishes those who distort the good news to be accursed (1.8, 9).

-49-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Paul and Jesus: The True Story
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 195

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.