Lord Jesus Christ: Devotion to Jesus in Earliest Christianity

By Larry W. Hurtado | Go to book overview

CHAPTER ONE
Forces and Factors

The real challenge in historical understanding is to figure out not only what happened, but also how it happened and why. The accurate logging and description of the sources and all relevant data is crucial, of course, and is itself a fully worthy and demanding historical task. But the difficult intellectual tasks are to identify the forces and factors that prompted and shaped people and events, and to understand how these forces and factors operated. Probably every scholar who has examined any aspect of early Christ-devotion has had some notion of these things, but, to judge by their publications, few seem to have made these how and why questions much of a conscious or explicit focus. As I stated in the introduction, a good many scholars have simply subscribed to the syncretism theory of the religionsgeschichtliche Schule and have fitted their readings of the historical sources into this scheme. Of those who have explicitly attempted to offer a theory of their own (e.g., Casey, discussed below), none seems to me to have done adequate justice to the range of relevant data and the particularities of early Christ-devotion, and none seems to have drawn adequately upon what we can learn from other relevant disciplines about the rise and development of new religious movements.

When we are dealing with something as remarkable and historically significant as early Christ-devotion, it is all the more crucial to try to grasp the factors involved.1 The more unusual something is, however, the more difficult it is to explain, especially because modern historical understanding is so unavoid

1. There is no denying the historical significance of the emergence of Christ-devotion, as
it led to Jesus becoming perhaps the best-known figure in human history. In One God, One
Lord: Early Christian Devotion and Ancient Jewish Monotheism
(Philadelphia: Fortress, 1988; 2nd
ed., Edinburgh: T. & T. Clark, 1998), I demonstrated that it was unusual and cannot be fitted
easily within a pattern of analogous developments of the time.

-27-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Lord Jesus Christ: Devotion to Jesus in Earliest Christianity
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 746

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.