Acknowledgments

The idea for this book came to me after years of work, earlier in my career, on both German youth and various institutions of the Nazi movement, in particular the Nazi Party. Over several years, research for the book was generously supported by grants from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, the Alexander von Humboldt-Stiftung (Konrad Adenauer Research Award), a two-year Senior Killam Fellowship of the Canada Council, and York University. Without this financial assistance, the opportunities for gathering basic materials from German, Austrian, and U.S. archives, as well as university release time to write, could never have been provided.

As my plan for the book took shape, I was able to present and discuss it in colloquia arranged by colleagues in North America and Germany. At York University, the Canadian Centre for German and European Studies, where I am based, arranged a meeting with faculty and students through the good offices of its directors, Jeffrey Peck and Mark Webber. At the Historisches Kolleg in Munich, Jürgen Reulecke, Reinhard Spree, Gerhard A. Ritter, Hans Mommsen, and Wolfgang Hardrwig convened colleagues for several hours of presentation and lively discussion. Hans Rudolf Vaget did the same for me at Smith College. Hartmut Lehmann of the Max Planck-Institut für Geschichte in Göttingen discussed with me some of my earlier ideas for this book, as did Jörg Wolff at the Institut für Rechtswissenschaften (Arbeitsgruppe

-347-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Hitler Youth
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents *
  • 1: [Make Way, You Old Ones!] 1
  • 2: Serving in the Hitler Youth 13
  • 3: German Girls for Matrimony and Motherhood 70
  • 4: Dissidents and Rebels 113
  • 5: Hitler's Youth at War 167
  • 6: The Responsibility of Youth 247
  • Abbreviations 267
  • Notes 271
  • Acknowledgments 347
  • Index 349
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 355

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.