Neo-Liberal Ideology: History, Concepts and Policies

By Rachel S. Turner | Go to book overview

Index
Adam Smith Institute, 153
Adams, John, 33, 197
Adenauer, Konrad, 88
Allais, Maurice, 71
American Civil War, 34–5
American Enterprise Institute, 102–3, 221, 223
American Public Health Association, 144
American Revolution, 7, 32, 33, 143
Anderson, Martin, 106
Anti-Corn Law League, 25
Aristotle, 29
Aron, Raymond, 64
Association for Improving the Condition of the Poor, 143
Attlee, Clement, 146
Austrian School of Economics, 15, 23, 81, 101, 119–20, 121–6, 136
Baroody, William, 103
Bastiat, Frederic, 25
Benn, Ernest, 65
Bentham, Jeremy, 24, 36, 41, 196
Berlin, Isaiah, 64
Beveridge, William, 57, 148, 156
Beveridge Report, 38, 57, 146
Bill of Rights (Britain), 169
Bill of Rights (United States), 172
Birch Nigel, 91
Bismarck, Otto von, 144
Böhm, Franz, 82, 83, 176–7
Bow Group, 91–2
Bretton Woods, 135
Bright, John, 25
Britain
and collectivism, 55–7, 68
Constitution, 6, 169–71, 183–4
and classical liberalism, 22–7, 29, 34, 36, 53, 119–20, 130
and European integration, 88
and liberalism, 14, 22–7, 36–8, 41, 42, 133
and neo-liberalism, 3, 65, 84, 89–98, 131–2, 220–1; see also New Right
and the new liberalism, 36–8
and private property, 194–6
and social policy, 141–3, 144–6, 152–6, 157–62
Brittan, Samuel, 96
Brookings Institute, 102
Brown, Lewis H., 102
Buchanan, James, 6, 168, 173–4, 182–4, 188–9, 221
Buchanan, Patrick, 99
Buckley, William, F, 100–1, 221
Burton, John, 183–4
Bush, George W, 224
Butler, R. A., 90
capitalism see markets
Carr, Robert, 91
Cato Institute, 7, 221, 223
Centre for Policy Studies, 7, 95–7, 159, 220
Chicago School of Economics, 101, 221–2
Christian Democratic Union, 89
Christianity, 83, 100, 143
Civil Rights Act, 199
classical economics see classical liberalism
classical liberalism, 1, 7, 8, 14, 22–5, 29, 34, 35, 36–7, 48–9, 50, 53–5, 60, 68, 75, 82, 86, 90, 101, 108, 116–21, 130, 136, 141–3, 153, 163, 196, 201, 216

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