Chapter 1
Introduction

We can begin to see the relevance of Scott to our own age if we consider some of the consequences of the abrupt regime changes that have occurred across the globe in the last few decades. From Eastern Europe to Latin America, from Asia to the Middle East, as governments have fallen, nations have seen themselves, or been seen by others, as emerging from oppressive regimes into more liberal or more modern ones. Where sudden political change gets linked to ideas of modernisation, liberalisation, even civilisation, historical accountability comes to be seen as a key test of legitimacy. This helps to explain both the current popularity of truth commissions (at least twenty-one since 1974) and the spectacular growth of 'social memory' as a field of study – a field in which the 'truth' about the past tends to be seen as inseparable from the political interests and material needs of particular groups in the present.1 The rapid demise of so many authoritarian regimes has led to a rekindling of debate about the inevitability of progress towards liberal forms of government, accompanied by the resurrection of traditional ideas about the human cost of liberalisation (as in Francis Fukuyama's account of the loss of thymos – self-esteem, or 'spiritedness').2 These responses to the experience of change give new form to preoccupations that began to emerge in the enlightenment and gained increased urgency in the wake of the French revolution. To generations of nineteenthcentury readers, these preoccupations found their most resonant fictional expression in the works of Walter Scott.

Scott's first readers had lived through an age of violent revolutions and great wars, in which huge armies had been mobilised, governments dramatically overthrown, populations displaced. The conflicts involving European powers spread far beyond Europe, and did not – as is sometimes supposed – end completely on the field of Waterloo. They continued in parts of Europe, in South America, in the Middle East, India, Burma, Africa.3 The violence also continued sporadically in mainland

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Walter Scott and Modernity
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Chapter 1 - Introduction 1
  • Chapter 2 - Towards the Modern Nation 30
  • Chapter 3 - The Condition of England 67
  • Chapter 4 - Western Identities and the Orient 89
  • Chapter 5 - Commerce, Civilisation, War, and the Highlands 121
  • Chapter 6 - Liberal Dilemmas: Scott and Covenanting Tradition 151
  • Chapter 7 - Liberal Dilemmas: Liberty or Alienation? 188
  • Chapter 8 - Postscript 218
  • Bibliography 222
  • Index 244
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 254

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.