Roosevelt the Reformer: Theodore Roosevelt as Civil Service Commissioner, 1889-1895

By Richard D. White Jr. | Go to book overview

Notes on Sources

ANY RESEARCHER who dares to probe the fascinating life of Theodore Roosevelt faces both the blessing and curse of a man who has spawned a wealth of material not only from a score of historians and biographers but from Theodore's own prolific pen. Exhaustively researched works, both on Roosevelt's entire lifetime and on important episodes of his life, provide an incisive and often controversial biographia that is surpassed in volume by writings on only a few other public personages. The vast Roosevelt lore notwithstanding, several sources stand out as critical to any research. In his life, Roosevelt wrote more than 150,000 letters, of which about 10 percent are published. The Letters of Theodore Roosevelt, an eight-volume set edited by Elting Morison, offers the most priceless glimpse into Roosevelt's correspondence and provides the backbone of Rooseveltian research. Henry Cabot Lodge and Roosevelt's sister Anna Roosevelt Cowles each published other volumes of his letters, and Lawrence Oliver edited the letters between Roosevelt and Brander Matthews. Unfortunately, Roosevelt's second wife, Edith, destroyed much of their personal correspondence after his death in 1919.

The Theodore Roosevelt Collection at Harvard remains the dominant research source. The collection houses a vast store of Roosevelt's personal and professional letters, records, pictures, scrapbooks, and assorted correspondence. Far from static, the collection continues to expand as additional Roosevelt material is bequeathed to Harvard by heirs and collectors. The Theodore Roosevelt Historical Site at Sagamore

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Roosevelt the Reformer: Theodore Roosevelt as Civil Service Commissioner, 1889-1895
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Roosevelt the Reformer ix
  • Introduction 1
  • 1: 1889 Arriving in Washington 7
  • 2: 1890 Attacked from All Quarters 35
  • 3: 1891 Building Valuable Friendships 54
  • 4: 1892 Making Progress in Civil Service Reform 79
  • 5: 1893 Reappointment by the Democrats 97
  • 6: 1894 Building the Merit System 119
  • 7: 1895 Returning to New York 141
  • 8: 1901 Continuing Reform as President 160
  • Epilogue - 1916 Rapprochement 184
  • Appendix 189
  • Notes on Sources 203
  • Notes 207
  • Bibliography 241
  • Acknowledgments 253
  • Index 255
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