Lines in the Sand: Congressional Redistricting in Texas and the Downfall of Tom Delay

By Steve Bickerstaff | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 9
Personal Dilemmas:
The First Special Session

Every now and then, Godzilla eats the city.

— STATE REP. JIM DUNNAM, AUSTIN AMERICAN-STATESMAN, JULY 8, 2003

Many Democrats and Republicans faced personal dilemmas over redistricting during the summer of 2003. Each Democrat who took a firm stand against the Republican juggernaut did so only by risking his or her own personal status in the Senate and, ultimately, their own personal financial and political wellbeing. No one, however, faced a greater dilemma than three Republicans.


Lieutenant Governor David Dewhurst

Lieutenant Governor Dewhurst is a tall (six feet five) slender man, with saltand-pepper hair, expensive attire, and a seemingly perpetual tan from working at his ranch—a distinguished appearance.1 Independently wealthy from his success as a businessman, Dewhurst was elected lieutenant governor in 2002 after serving as commissioner of the state's General Land office. He had never served in the Senate before becoming its presiding officer. Dewhurst was absolutely critical to the success of any Republican redistricting effort. Without his help, redistricting would have been impossible. Dewhurst, however, indicated publicly early in 2003 that he was concerned about going along with redistricting because such a controversial issue could needlessly divide the Senate along partisan lines and damage his efforts to work with all senators, to maintain the bipartisan cooperation necessary for the chamber's productive operation. However, Dewhurst also had ambitions for higher office. He agreed that the Democrats' seventeen-to-fifteen advantage in the congressional delegation was unfair, and he knew that being perceived by Republican activists and major

-160-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Lines in the Sand: Congressional Redistricting in Texas and the Downfall of Tom Delay
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 472

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.