Lines in the Sand: Congressional Redistricting in Texas and the Downfall of Tom Delay

By Steve Bickerstaff | Go to book overview

Resources
This book relies on information obtained principally from the following sources:
1.. Testimony, exhibits, depositions, and pleadings from Paul Clayton v. Bill Ceverha, (Cause No. GN-301481, Travis County District Court), the state-court civil suit by defeated state House candidates against Bill Ceverha, the treasurer of Texans for a Republican Majority. The author attended the five days of the trial in 2005.
2.. Testimony, exhibits, depositions, and pleadings from the consolidated federal lawsuits challenging the lawfulness of the 2003 congressional redistricting. The case was styled Session v. Perry when tried in 2003. Due to a change in named plaintiffs, the case later became identified as Henderson v. Perry. The case number (Civil Action 2:03-CV-354 "E.D. Tex.") has remained the same. The court's 2005 opinion appears at 300 F. Supp. 2d 756 (E.D. Tex.). At the United States Supreme Court the case is styled LULAC v. Perry. Of greatest value as a resource are the memoranda sent in 2003 by Jim Ellis to Congressman Tom DeLay, describing the redistricting process as it happened. All of the memoranda are grouped under a single exhibit, Plaintiff Jackson Exhibit 136.
3.. Interviews in 2005 and 2006 by the author with approximately fifty persons who participated in the events covered by this book. A few of the interviews with defeated Republican primary candidates were conducted by the author's research assistant, law student Mason Hestor. The interviews are listed below. A few interviewees asked not to be identified, and therefore are not listed.
4.. official journals from the Texas House of Representatives and Texas Senate from the regular and special sessions of the 78th Texas Legislature in 2003. The major debates in the legislature were reduced to writing and included in these journals. Some oral recordings and videotapes were reviewed from 2001 and 2003. Information on the history of politics in Texas and on the state's elected officials (past and present) is generally available from multiple sources available at the Texas Legislative Reference Library.
5.. official maps and demographic and political data produced by the Texas Legislative Council during the process in 2003. These reports are available from the council. Some materials were obtained from Patsy Spaw, the secretary of the Texas Senate, regarding the history of events and procedures in that legislative body.
6.. official campaign financial reports filed with the Texas Ethics Commission, along with ethics opinions from the commission. Some of this information was obtained directly by the author. Some of it was compiled at the author's request by the nonprofit organization Texans for Public Justice, which routinely monitors and reports on campaign-finance filings.
7.. Newspaper articles from the periods in question, describing the events as they occurred and quoting the participants. The articles reviewed for this book came from over twenty daily periodicals in Texas. Several of these newspapers had reporters in Austin and covered the story daily. These newspapers usually carried the same coverage of a day's events, but often with added twists or quotes not offered in the other papers. National publications also were reviewed for specific

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