Neo-Confederacy: A Critical Introduction

By Euan Hague; Edward H. Sebesta et al. | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

I would like to thank Steve Davis, Andy Matranga, Jamey Essex, and Tracy Edwards, who completed papers on neo-Confederacy in courses at Syracuse University. They offered new ideas and insights for which I am grateful. Don Mitchell, John Agnew, Jim Glassman, John Western, and John Mercer were sources of ideas, suggestions, and encouragement. At DePaul University many thanks are due to the Geography Department's supportive environment and my colleagues Pat McHaffie, Alex Papadopoulos, Win Curran, Alec Brownlow, Maureen Sioh, and Kim Diver. Laura Carter, Andrea Craft, Kristin Wood, Denise Rogers, Mary Devona, D. J. Forbes, Jennifer Rodríguez, Joe Menard, and Jenny Hampton were called upon to proofread, make photocopies, scan documents, and track down references, often on short notice. Their work is greatly appreciated. I am also grateful to have received DePaul University Research Grants and Competitive Research Leave to complete this book. Michael McMullan at the Memphis Commercial Appeal and Jenny Warburg helped to track down photographs. Bill Bishel at University of Texas Press patiently supported this project from proposal to publication, and the anonymous reviewers he enrolled to evaluate the book provided positive feedback and numerous valuable suggestions. My co-contributors were always responsive and gracious when I requested revisions on countless occasions. Tanks are also due to Mark Potok and Nancy McLean for providing copies of their essays, to Teun van Dijk for answering my emailed questions about the League of the South's discourse, and to Eric Schramm for copyediting the manuscript. My family has always been there to answer my questions and hear my frustrations. Last, writing and compiling this book would not have been possible without the intellectual and emotional support of Carrie.

Euan Hague

-xiii-

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