The Primacy of Vision in Virgil's Aeneid

By Riggs Alden Smith | Go to book overview

Preface and Acknowledgments

My desire to consider vision in the Aeneid is in part derived from an interest in ancient art that I first cultivated at the Intercollegiate Center for Classical Studies in Rome, a program that I attended as an undergraduate under Mary Sturgeon and Fred Albertson. My own research about ecphrasis, which I considered in my first book, also influenced my consideration of the topic of vision in the Aeneid. Based on my preliminary studies, I gave papers at Princeton, Yale, Wesleyan, Columbia, Notre Dame of Maryland, Austin College, Texas Tech, Monmouth College, the University of Texas at Austin, the University of Vermont, and later, at Penn and Colorado. While only a little of the specific content of any of these lectures has come into this book, the development of my methodology is owed to them, and I wish to thank each of those departments for a warm reception and lively discussion. To Denis Feeney, David Quint, Jim O'Hara, Gareth Williams, Sister Thérèse Dougherty, Robert Cape, Edward George, Karl Galinsky, Tom Sienkewicz, Phil Ambrose, Joe Farrell, and Peter Knox, and all their colleagues, I express my gratitude here.

I wish to thank the committees for research grants and sabbaticals at Baylor University, for without a respite from my duties at Baylor and without adequate financial support I could not have undertaken this project; special thanks to Wallace Daniel, Thomas Hibbs, David Jeffrey, Donald Schmeltekopf, and Robert Sloan for support, encouragement, and vision. I would also like to thank Tommye Lou Davis for taking over as acting chair of the department in my absence.

I wrote this book in Philadelphia, where I used the resources of the University of Pennsylvania's Van Pelt Library. I wish to thank the kind librarians there, as well as those of Moody Library at Baylor and of the Classics Library

-ix-

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The Primacy of Vision in Virgil's Aeneid
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface and Acknowledgments ix
  • Text and Art Acknowledgments xiii
  • Abbreviations xv
  • Chapter 1 - Prophaenomena Ad Vergilium 1
  • Chapter 2 - Ruse and Revelation Visions of the Divine and the Telos of Narrative 24
  • Chapter 3 - Vision Past and Future 60
  • Chapter 4 - Hic Amor Love, Vision, and Destiny 97
  • Chapter 5 - Vidi, Vici Vision's Victory and the Telos of Narrative 128
  • Chapter 6 - Conclusion Ante Ora Parentum 176
  • Notes 183
  • Bibliography 223
  • Subject Index 237
  • Index Locorum 247
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