Public Values and Public Interest: Counterbalancing Economic Individualism

By Barry Bozeman | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

My thanks begin with Monica Gaughan. As faculty colleague, spouse, and critic, Monica contributed with heart and mind, inspiring me with her ideas, courage, integrity, and, most of all, her unique brand of outrageousness.

Two individuals who contributed a great deal to the book are designated as chapter coauthors. Mary Feeney (University of Georgia) has been working with me for several years on various aspects of the public values agenda and wrote much of chapter 2. In addition, she read the entire manuscript and offered valuable criticism, and she provided research assistance for the book. Ben Minteer (Arizona State University) is perhaps the world's premier scholar of John Dewey's philosophy as it pertains to public interest theory and environmental ethics. He helped shape the book and is a coauthor of chapter 4.

Torben Beck Jorgensen (University of Copenhagen) has served as an informal consultant, confidante, and critic. He read a complete first draft of the manuscript and provided excellent advice that led to many improvements.

Researchers at the Consortium for Science, Policy and Outcomes (CSPO), now centered at Arizona State University, have been instrumental in many ways, providing support, encouragement, and collaboration. I am particularly grateful to CSPO stalwarts Michael Crow, Daniel Sarewitz, and David Guston.

Three of my colleagues at Georgia Institute of Technology, my faculty home during most of the time I was writing this book, have been extremely helpful. Thanks to Bryan Norton, Gordon Kingsley, and Juan Rogers. They listened patiently as I struggled to develop rough ideas and provided many useful suggestions.

At my current academic home, University of Georgia, my colleague Hal Rainey provided his usual excellent advice and criticism. He read the entire first draft of the manuscript and provided excellent ideas for revision. Our decadeslong dialogue about “publicness” has greatly influenced my thinking and, just as important, encouraged me to keep working on this endlessly fascinating topic. George Frederickson read and commented on the draft manuscript, and his efforts have helped me produce a book that is much better than it would have been without his advice. I have also been greatly influenced by reading the excellent body of theory and research he has produced on topics pertaining to citizenship, community, and public interest. Finally, I am grateful to the highly competent, professional, and congenial staff at Georgetown University Press, especially Gail Grella.

-ix-

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