Young Adult Science Fiction

By C. W. Sullivan Iii | Go to book overview

12
Science Fiction for Children and
Young Adults: Criticism and Other
Secondary Materials

Michael M. Levy

It is the purpose of this bibliography to provide the reader with a source of information on every author who has published children’s or young adult science fiction of consequence. Some such writers, Madeleine L’Engle and Robert A. Heinlein, for example, have been widely written about. Others, of lesser but still considerable importance, for example, Alexander Key and Diana Wynne Jones, have received scant critical attention. For authors about whom little has been written, the most complete discussion of their work is frequently found in reference books, either those specializing in children’s literature or those specializing in science fiction, so I have often directed the reader to such works. A list of the most important reference volumes in children’s literature and science fiction will be found in Section A.

A note is perhaps necessary on the criteria used to decide who was or was not to be included in this bibliography. In general, fantasy writers have been excluded, even writers who have done adult science fiction, but whose books for children and young adults are fantasy, for example, Ursula K. LeGuin and C. S. Lewis. A number of writers have been included, however, whose work for children rides the borderline between science fiction and fantasy, for example, L’Engle, Anne McCaffrey, and William Mayne. Materials about authors who write primarily for an adult audience, Isaac Asimov and Robert Silverberg, for example, are included only to the extent that they make direct reference to the author’s work for children, consider the appropriateness of the author’s adult work for children, or survey the author’s entire career. Children’s writers known primarily for their non-science fiction, Frank Bonham and K. M. Peyton, for example, are included, but mentioned only briefly. It is occasionally debatable as to whether a certain work or body of work is aimed primarily at an adult or juvenile audience, and I have had to make a number of judgment calls, decisions with which other critics or users of this bibliography may or may not agree. Wells and Verne, for example, have

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