Walter Mosley: A Critical Companion

By Charles E. Wilson Jr | Go to book overview

Series Foreword

The authors who appear in the series Critical Companions to Popular Contemporary Writers are all best-selling writers. They do not simply have one successful novel, but a string of them. Fans, critics, and specialist readers eagerly anticipate their next book. For some, high cash advances and breakthrough sales figures are automatic; movie deals often follow. Some writers become household names, recognized by almost everyone.

But their novels are read one by one. Each reader chooses to start and, more importantly, to finish a book because of what she or he finds there. The real test of a novel is in the satisfaction its readers experience. This series acknowledges the extraordinary involvement of readers and writers in creating a best-seller.

The authors included in this series were chosen by an advisory board composed of high school English teachers and high school and public librarians. They ranked a list of best-selling writers according to their popularity among different groups of readers. For the first series, writers in the top-ranked group who had received no book-length, academic, literary analysis (or none in at least the past ten years) were chosen. Because of this selection method, Critical Companions to Popular Contemporary Writers meets a need that is being addressed nowhere else. The success of these volumes as reported by reviewers, librarians, and teachers led to an expansion of the series mandate to include some writers with wide

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Walter Mosley: A Critical Companion
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Advisory Board vi
  • Contents vii
  • Series Foreword ix
  • 1: The Life of Walter Mosley 1
  • 2: Literary Heritage 19
  • 3: Devil in a Blue Dress (1990) 35
  • 4: Black Betty (1994) 57
  • 5: Rl's Dream (1995) 79
  • 6: A Little Yellow Dog (1996) 101
  • 7: Always Outnumbered, Always Outgunned (1998) 125
  • 8: Blue Light (1998) 145
  • 9: Fearless Jones (2001) 167
  • 10: Bad Boy Brawly Brown (2002) 189
  • Bibliography 207
  • Index 221
  • About the Author 233
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