War Paint: Madame Helena Rubinstein and Miss Elizabeth Arden : Their Lives, Their Times, Their Rivalry

By Lindy Woodhead | Go to book overview
Save to active project

CHAPTER FIVE
MADAME ON THE MOVE
Melbourne, London, Paris
1905–1914

HELENA RUBINSTEIN LEFT AUSTRALIA in 1905 a gifted beginner in the business of beauty and returned a consummate professional. Her first stop was Krakow, where she admitted to having an uneasy meeting with her parents. She would later write:

When I returned to Krakow, I found it had not changed at all, yet to
my eyes it had grown smaller. It was still a beautiful city, but I
thought it quiet and dull and life there had become alien to me. I’m
sorry to think I cut short my visit to my parents’ home, but I had to
hurry to Paris to begin my studies under the famous dermatologist,
Dr Berthalot.

In reality, it seems likely she never saw her father at all, merely spending an hour or so with her mother, still clearly unable to comprehend the aggressive vitality of her eldest and still unmarried daughter. The deeply orthodox Rubinsteins were still living in Kazimierz, an area by now inhabited by people Helena considered depressingly poor. Her estrangement from her parents wasn’t rectified by this brief visit. She was never to see either of them alive again.

Whether or not Helena studied with ‘Dr Berthalot’ isn’t known, but she certainly went to Paris, where she found a bed at her sister Pauline Hirschberg’s home. ‘Aunt Hela’s’ visit clearly captivated the Hirschberg’s thirteen-year-old daughter, Marcelle, who would later work for her aunt in Argentina, whilst her mother did ‘family duty’ by running Helena’s first Paris salon which she opened in 1909. Helena knew expansion depended on

-69-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
War Paint: Madame Helena Rubinstein and Miss Elizabeth Arden : Their Lives, Their Times, Their Rivalry
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 492

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?