War Paint: Madame Helena Rubinstein and Miss Elizabeth Arden : Their Lives, Their Times, Their Rivalry

By Lindy Woodhead | Go to book overview
Save to active project

CHAPTER THIRTEEN
CHALLENGES AND CHANGES
America and Europe
1933–1937

How men hate a woman in a position of real power

—Eleanor Roosevelt

PRESIDENT ROOSEVELT’S DYNAMIC ADMINISTRATION brought challenges and changes for the booming beauty business in America. After a quarter of a century of freedom in terms of manufacturing, labelling and advertising, the industry was hit by new rules and regulations.

Firstly, Washington decided to levy a luxury tax on all products. The only surprise is that it had taken government so long to spot such a lucrative source of income from an industry reported to be worth $2 billion a year and growing. By 1931, a study of college women showed 85% of them wore lipstick, and at Macy’s in New York, working women spent their lunch break in the vast beauty department, sniffing scented powder compacts and scrambling to buy lipsticks. The tax of 10% caused a furore amongst manufacturers who, in a rare moment of harmony, met to debate how to handle the levy. They were not alone in their annoyance. Women’s groups took up the cudgels and protested that lipstick was as important to them as toothpaste, but the government was not to be moved.

Most companies, including Arden and Rubinstein, saw no problem in passing the cost on to their customers, whilst Dorothy Gray, Arden’s bête noire from the previous decade, made a big issue about ‘absorbing the charges’, earning herself valuable press coverage. In the end, manufacturers decided that make-up lines lipstick, rouge, powder and mascara would carry the levy, whilst treatment creams would absorb it.

-197-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
War Paint: Madame Helena Rubinstein and Miss Elizabeth Arden : Their Lives, Their Times, Their Rivalry
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 492

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?