When Race Becomes Real: Black and White Writers Confront Their Personal Histories

By Bernestine Singley | Go to book overview

WHEN
RACE
BECOMES
REAL
Black and
White Writers
Confront
Their Personal
Histories

Edited by Bernestine Singley
Epilogue by Derrick Bell

-iii-

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When Race Becomes Real: Black and White Writers Confront Their Personal Histories
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction xi
  • I. Genesis 1
  • Race Story 3
  • Crazy Sometimes 21
  • Experiences and Memories 29
  • The Night I Stopped Being a Negro 37
  • Son of the South 51
  • Talking White 71
  • Central Park Samaritan 79
  • It All Started with My Parents 87
  • Ii. Fear and Longing 99
  • Race, Rage, and the Ace of Spades 101
  • To Make Them Stand in Fear 111
  • Passing 139
  • Black and White 143
  • For Colored Girls· Who Have Resisted Homogenization When the Rainbow Ain't Enough 159
  • Anatomy of a Fairy Princess 173
  • A Rambling Response to the Pίay Marie Christine 183
  • Black, White, and Seeing Red All over 193
  • Race Fatigue 207
  • Iii. Exodus 213
  • Choosing to Be Black— the Ultimate White Privilege? 215
  • White like Me: Race and Identity through Majority Eyes 225
  • Traveling with White People 241
  • Race: a Discussion in Ten Parts, Plus a Few Moments of Unsubstantiated Theory and One Inarguable Fact 253
  • A Funky Fresh Talented Tenth 269
  • On Acting White: Mother-Daughter Talk 273
  • Country Music 283
  • One Summer Evening 291
  • Spelling Lesson 303
  • Jasper, Texas Elegy 307
  • All Souls: Civil Rights from Southie to Soweto and Back 317
  • Pictures in Black and White 323
  • Epilogue 327
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