Mapping Male Sexuality: Nineteenth-Century England

By Jay Losey; William D. Brewer | Go to book overview

Disguising the Self in Pater and Wilde

JAY LOSEY

WHEN WILDE PROCLAIMED “[T]HERE IS NO PATER BUT PATER, AND Oscar Wilde is his prophet,” he created an impression that the naturally reserved Pater must have found unsettling.1 In his biography of Pater, Thomas Wright asserts that even though the two men were intimate, “Pater, in his heart of hearts, regarded Wilde with continuous dislike.”2 Writing in the aftermath of Wilde’s fall and death, Wright may have wanted to preserve the image of Pater as Pater— despite the pronouncements of his fallen disciple.3 Wright portrays Pater as moving toward conservatism, as refashioning his early subversive, radical self into a pious, proper Victorian: “He had passed from Cyrenaicism to Platonism, and from Platonism to Christianity. Already the Bible, the Prayer-Book, and the Breviary were, as he told a friend, his chief reading.”4 Why would Wright intentionally stress Pater’s “Christianity”?5 He contends that, after professional setbacks early in his academic career, Pater waged a lifelong campaign to appear less daring than he actually was. Wilde also states his disappointment in aestheticism’s apostle: “poor dear Pater has lived to disprove everything that he has written.”6 Similarly, Wright is fuzzy in his rendering of the Pater-Wilde relationship.7 Pater’s letters to Wilde appear to attest to their friendship.8 Further, Pater read the manuscript version of Dorian Gray in 1890 and so knew that Wilde had appropriated many passages from The Renaissance (1873) and Marius the Epicurean (1885); he made Wilde’s quip about living up to his blue china “the epigraph to the unpublished part of his last book, Gaston de Latour9; he, by all accounts, maintained cordial relations with Wilde at least until 1891, the fateful year in which Wilde met “Bosie,” Lord Alfred Douglas;10 and both writers shared a lifelong concern to promote a new Hellenism to lighten Victorian England.

Wright may have found objectionable the same-sex relationships that Pater and Wilde subversively present in their work.” In any case, he unconvincingly divides Pater and Wilde by portraying Pater as one who follows the madding crowd. But from beginning

-250-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Mapping Male Sexuality: Nineteenth-Century England
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 376

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.