Mapping Male Sexuality: Nineteenth-Century England

By Jay Losey; William D. Brewer | Go to book overview

List of Contributors

KEVIN BINFIELD is Assistant Professor of English at Murray State University. He is interested in working-class authors of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. He has published articles on William Cobbett, Percy Bysshe Shelley, and Joanna Southcott and is currently finishing a book, under contract with Johns Hopkins University Press, on the writings of the Luddite movement.

WILLIAM D. BREWER is Professor of English at Appalachian State University. He received his A.B. from Harvard University (magna cum laude) in 1977 and his M.A. and Ph.D. in English literature from the University of Virginia in 1979 and 1985, respectively. He is a member of the Keats-Shelley Association, the Modern Language Association, the North American Society for the Study of Romanticism, and the John Clare Society. His previous publications include The Shelley-Byron Conversation (University Press of Florida, 1994), and articles in Papers on Language and Literature, Philological Quarterly, Keats-Shelley Journal, and Southern Humanities Review. He has also edited New Essays on Lord Byron (Contemporary Research Press, forthcoming).

ERIC DAFFRON is Assistant Professor of English at Mississippi University for Women. In addition to having written articles on William Godwin, Mary Shelley, and Jane Austen, he is completing a book manuscript entitled “Romantic Doubles: Sex and Sympathy in British Gothic Literature, 1790–1830.

ANDRÉ L. DECUIR is Assistant Professor of English at Muskingum College and specializes in Victorian literature. He has published and presented papers on George Eliot, Mary Shelley, Thomas Hardy, Charlotte Bronte, and Elizabeth Gaskell; Stephen King and the aesthetics of horror fiction has become a growing scholarly interest.

ELIZABETH DELL is a Ph.D. candidate at the University of Texas, Austin. Her dissertation, titled “When Mammy Left Missus: Confed

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