Romantic Shakespeare: From Stage to Page

By Younglim Han | Go to book overview

3
Lamb and the “Gap of Indeterminacy”

THE DISTINCTION BETWEEN THE PHRASES “APPLIED” AND “THEORETICAL criticism” made by E. M. W. Tillyard serves to propose the direction of this chapter:

The greatest, like any other, criticism may be either theoretical or ap-
plied. It may be something (like Coleridge’s “willing suspension of
disbelief that constitutes the moment of poetic faith”) that illumines
the working of the poetic process or of the aesthetic sense, or it may
be … something that recreates the critic’s impression in a separate
work of art, which, whether by a greater simplicity than existed in the
original creation or by a slight exaggeration of what is peculiar or
unique, leads the reader to a more intimate understanding of the
original than would have been possible without its help. Of English
masters of “theoretical” criticism Coleridge is the greatest, of applied,
in a sense, Lamb.1

Tillyard uses the term “applied criticism” to emphasize Lamb’s “faculty brooding over,” “quality of self-surrender” to, and “intimate sympathy” with, what he reads (Tillyard, p. ix, xi). The notion of Lamb’s self-surrender of his personality marks his recognition of the textual authority and the need for his creative response to the depth of the author’s power of thought. It highlights Lamb’s reading experience in which he tries to formulate his own concept of an ideal readership of imaginative works of art. The fact that Lamb was not under the influence of any special school of philosophy or criticism as Coleridge was supports Tillyard’s idea of Lamb’s “amateurishness” and “bookishness” (Tillyard, p. xi, ix): where Coleridge expounded his own critical principles and practice, Lamb tried to be receptive to the workings of the text. Tillyard’s comparative account is endorsed by John I. Ades: “Lamb’s Shakespearean criticism natu

-98-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Romantic Shakespeare: From Stage to Page
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Contents 7
  • Acknowledgments 9
  • 1 - Introduction- Shakespeare, Romantics, and Reader-Response Critics 13
  • 2 - Romanticism and Historicism 55
  • 3 - Lamb and the "Gap of Indeterminacy" 98
  • 4 - Coleridge and "Interpretive Communities" 144
  • 5 - Hazlitt and "Dialogic Communication" 187
  • Notes 212
  • Bibliography 232
  • Index 246
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 252

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.