Romantic Shakespeare: From Stage to Page

By Younglim Han | Go to book overview

Notes

1. INTRODUCTION: SHAKESPEARE, ROMANTICS,
AND READER-RESPONSE CRITICS

1. Robert Witbeck Babcock, The Genesis of Shakespeare Idolatry 1766–1799: A Study in English Criticism of the Late Eighteenth Century (New York: Russell & Russell, 1964), 226.

2. David Bromwich, ed., Romantic Critical Essays (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1987), 20

3. Biographia Literaria, ed. James Engell and W. Jackson Bate, 2 vols., vol. 7 of The Collected Works of Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Bollingen Series 75, (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1983), 2: 19. Further references are abbreviated to BL and follow quotations in the text with numbers of volumes.

4. Jonathan Bate, Shakespeare and the English Romantic Imagination (1986; reprint, as a paperback with corrections, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1989), 5.

5. Bate, 5.

6. Stuart Curran, ed. The Cambridge Companion to British Romanticism (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1993), pp. xiii–xiv.

7. Coleridge’s quotations of Shakespeare used throughout this thesis refer to the edition by Thomas Middleton Raysor, Shakespearean Criticism, 2d ed., Everyman’s Library 162 & 183, 2 vols. (London: J. M. Dent & Sons; New York: E. P. Dutton, 1960), unless otherwise mentioned. All quotations from Shakespeare are followed by act, scene and line references to William Shakespeare: The Complete Works, ed. Stanley Wells and others (1986; reprint, compact edition, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1988). References to King Lear are to the Folio text of 1623 The Tragedy of King Lear unless otherwise stated.

8. Shakespearean Criticism, ed. Thomas Middleton Raysor, 1: 44. Further references are abbreviated to SC and follow quotations in the text, with the volume number included. See also R. A. Foakes, ed., Lectures 1808–1819 on Literature, 2 vols., vol. 5 of The Collected Works of Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Bollingen Series 75 (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1987), 2: 315. Further references are abbreviated to LL and follow quotations in the text with numbers of volumes.

9. Characters of Shakespear’s Plays (l930), ed. P. P. Howe, vol. 4 of The Complete Works of William Hazlitt, 21 vols. (London and Toronto: J. M. Dent and Sons,

-212-

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Romantic Shakespeare: From Stage to Page
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Contents 7
  • Acknowledgments 9
  • 1 - Introduction- Shakespeare, Romantics, and Reader-Response Critics 13
  • 2 - Romanticism and Historicism 55
  • 3 - Lamb and the "Gap of Indeterminacy" 98
  • 4 - Coleridge and "Interpretive Communities" 144
  • 5 - Hazlitt and "Dialogic Communication" 187
  • Notes 212
  • Bibliography 232
  • Index 246
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