Romantic Shakespeare: From Stage to Page

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Index
Ades, John I., 98–99
Ainger, Alfred, 102–3, 121–22
All’s Well That Ends Well, 72, 117
Altick, Richard D., 132
Antitheatricalism, 25, 28, 30–31, 33–35, 48, 142, 193; disbelief in the performer’s capability, 41–42; disregard for rehearsal, 40–41; dissatisfaction with the lady audience, 46–47; distaste for large theaters, 34–35; emergence of the star, 38–40; ideal performance, 16–17; individualism, 19; public, 25–26; publication of the Tales, 142; Puritanism, 25–28; repertory theater, 36–37, 39–42; transvestism, 25, 44
Antony and Cleopatra, 184–85
Armstrong, Isobel, 53
Armstrong, Paul B., 66, 77–78
As You Like It, 110, 136
Ayscough, Samuel, 75
Babcock, Robert Witbeck, 14
Badawi, M. M., 49
Baker, Herschel, 61, 203
Barish, Jonas, 25–26
Barnet, Sylvan, 75–76
Barthes, Roland, 125–26
Bate, Jonathan, 28, 51; Coleridge’s identification with Hamlet, 144–45; Freudian psychology, 20; Ireland controversy, 58–59; Kemble’s historicizing project, 61; Kent-figure, 142; Lamb’s great strength, 99; Lamb’s sympathy for Kent, 144–45; Romantic Hamlet, 20; Romanticism, 15–16
Bate, Walter J., 156
Beardsley, Monroe C., 94–95
Beaumont, Francis, 29, 103, 105–6, 110, 117
Beer, John, 156
Beckerman, Bernard, 42
Bell, John, 43–44, 75
Bernasconi, Robert, 65
Bloom, Harold, 166, 202
Boaden, James, 61
Bonaparte, Napoleon, 18–19, 132, 181, 192–94, 196–97
Boose, Lynda E., 71
Booth, Wayne C., 78, 114–16
Boswell, James, 84–85
Bowdler, Henrietta Maria, 47–48, 138
Bowdler, Thomas, 47–48, 138
Boydell, Alderman John, 131–32
Bradbrook, M. C., 19, 29–31, 33, 62
Brett, R. L., 204
Bromwich, David, 14
Brown, John Russell, 52–53
Browne, Charlotte Elizabeth, 137–38
Burke, Edmund, 59, 61, 152–53, 179–82, 194, 198, 201
Buzacott, Martin, 26–27, 193
Carter, Angela, 36–37
Chalmers, George, 75
Charles, Prince of Wales, 22
Chedgzoy, Kate, 36
Christensen, Jerome C., 151

-246-

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Romantic Shakespeare: From Stage to Page
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Contents 7
  • Acknowledgments 9
  • 1 - Introduction- Shakespeare, Romantics, and Reader-Response Critics 13
  • 2 - Romanticism and Historicism 55
  • 3 - Lamb and the "Gap of Indeterminacy" 98
  • 4 - Coleridge and "Interpretive Communities" 144
  • 5 - Hazlitt and "Dialogic Communication" 187
  • Notes 212
  • Bibliography 232
  • Index 246
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