Remembering and Forgetting Nazism: Education, National Identity, and the Victim Myth in Postwar Austria

By Peter Utgaard | Go to book overview

Chapter Four
REMEMBERING AND FORGETTING THE
ALLIED OCCUPATION, REBUILDING,
AND THE STATE TREATY:
The Second Rebirth of Austria and New Symbols of
National Identity

They [the Allies] declare that they wish to see re-established a free and
independent Austria.

— Moscow Declaration, 1 November 19431

Natirlich – es war eine harte Zeit…man hat ein befreites Volk hungern
lassen.

— Der Herr Karl2

G’freit hab i mi scho…an den Tag, wo man ‘n bekommen ham…den
Staatsvertrag…Da san ma zum Belvedere zogn…san dag’standen…
unübersehbar…lauter Österreicher…wie im Jahr achtadreißig…Und
dann is er herausgetreten…der…der…Bundes-, der Poldl und hat
die zwa andern Herrschaften bei der Hand genommen und mutig
bekannt: “Österreich ist wieder frei!” Und wie i des g’hört hab, da
hab i g’wußt: Auch das hab ich jetzt geschafft. Es ist uns gelungen –
der Wiederaufbau.

— Der Herr Karl3

After years of painstaking negotiations, the Austrian State Treaty was signed on 15 May 1955. On 25 October 1955, the last Allied soldier left Austria, and the occupation was officially over. The next day, the Austrian government declared its permanent neutrality. Ten years later, in 1965, the twenty-sixth of October—already Austrian Flag Day—became the Austrian national holiday to honor that day when Austrian sovereignty was fully restored. Compared with East and West Germany, Austria found itself in an almost miraculous position. At the height of the

-129-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Remembering and Forgetting Nazism: Education, National Identity, and the Victim Myth in Postwar Austria
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 242

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.