Between Utopia and Disillusionment: A Narrative of the Political Transformation in Eastern Europe

By Henri Vogt | Go to book overview

Appendix 3:
Themes for the Czech Essayists
I gave this introduction to the project and list of essay themes to the essay writers in Prague in the winter of 1998. In addition, I explained to them orally what was important in the essays and in the research project more generally. (See Appendix 1.)
Introduction of the Project
The essays will be used as empirical material for my doctoral thesis. The working title of the thesis is ‘Utopia after the Revolutions of 1989. An analysis of Eastern European change based on studies in the Czech Republic, Eastern Germany and Estonia’.
In your essay you may try to discuss all the themes introduced below or you may choose just one or any number of them. The optimal length of your essay should be five pages of printed text, but less will of course do as well, if you can express your ideas economically.
Naturally you can write in Czech, but please do not use the most poetic expressions that come to your mind.
I don’t expect to receive any sort of scientific analyses concerning these themes. I am very interested in your personal experiences and personal opinions; small delicate stories that shed light on the themes would be valuable to me. For example, your parents’ interpretation of the change may have been significantly different from yours.
It would be helpful if you could also briefly describe what kind of person you are, e.g. if you are/have been politically active, if you are a businessman/woman etc; i.e. I should know if your views are connected to a specific context.
At the end of your essay, try to give a personal account or some concluding remarks about life and politics in post-communist Czechoslovakia. Have developments since 1989 signified the end of utopia (the Velvet Revolution was a utopia in many ways) from your point of view and in your country? Is there a future utopia for the country?
The official deadline for your essay is 1.3.1998.

-275-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Between Utopia and Disillusionment: A Narrative of the Political Transformation in Eastern Europe
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 333

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.