The Political Economy of Health Care Reforms

By Huizhong Zhou | Go to book overview

4
Health Insurance
and the Labor Market
Brigitte Madrian
University of ChicagoThe system of health insurance and health care delivery in the United States is very much like a patchwork quilt, one pieced together from scraps of cloth of different shapes, sizes, patterns, and textures, and colors. Like the quilt, we have a patchworked array of insuranceproviding institutions in the United States, each covering a different segment of the population, and each with its own idiosyncratic rules— its differences in shape, size, pattern, texture, and color, if you will.There are
the Medicare part A and B pieces that cover those over age 65 and the disabled under age 65;
the Medigap pieces that provide additional coverage to the elderly, beyond that available through Medicare;
the various state Medicaid pieces covering those who are or who have recently been on welfare, or those whose incomes are sufficiently low;
the myriad of employment-related health insurance pieces, covering many but not all employees, along with their spouses and dependents;
the employment-based retiree health insurance pieces, covering the former employees of companies, those who have since retired; and
the pieces that cover students attending various universities throughout the country and elsewhere.

And then there is the backdrop, the part of the quilt that generally goes unnoticed: the uninsured individuals who are not covered by any of the

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The Political Economy of Health Care Reforms
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgements vi
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - The Not-So-Simple Economics (And Politics) of Medicare Reform 9
  • 2 - Managed Care and Social Welfare 33
  • 3 - Covering the Uninsured 65
  • 4 - Health Insurance and the Labor Market 87
  • 5 - Health Care Consumer Choice 109
  • 6 - Positive Economics and Dismal Politics 125
  • Cited Author Index 147
  • Subject Index 151
  • About the Institute 163
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