Framing the Family: Narrative and Representation in the Medieval and Early Modern Periods

By Rosalynn Voaden; Diane Wolfthal | Go to book overview
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ABOUT THE CONTRIBUTORS

KAREN BOLLERMANN is currently completing her Ph.D. in Old English Literature at Arizona State University. Her dissertation is tentatively titled “Techniques of Variation in Beowulf.” Ms. Bollermann holds a J.D./M.B.A. jointly from University of California's Hastings College of the Law and Berkeley's Haas School of Business. She holds an A. B. in English Literature from Stanford University.

BRYAN CURD is a doctoral candidate in Art History at Arizona State University. Her interests are late Gothic and early modern art in the Netherlands and England. She is currently completing her dissertation on the collaborative and competitive practices of Netherlandish artists working in England and those of their English counterparts during the early modern period. She has previously published “Kurt Weiser: Evolving Vision” in Ceramics Art and Perception, and has served as project director for the reinstallation of the permanent collection at the ASU Art Museum.

SHARON FARMER is Professor of History at the University of California, Santa Barbara. She is the author of two monographs—Communities of Saint Martin: Legend and Ritual in Medieval Tours (Cornell UP, 1991) and Surviving Poverty in Medieval Paris: Gender, Ideology, and the Daily Lives of the Poor (Cornell University Press, 2001)—and the co-editor of three volumes of scholarly essays, including, with Carol Pasternack, “Gender and Difference in the Middle Ages” (University of Minnesota Press, 2003). She has been awarded a fellowship from the National Endowment for the Humanities to work on her next monograph, “From Saracen Work to Oeuvres de Paris: Oriental Luxuries, Parisian Crafts and the Making of Europe's Fashion Capital”.

EVA FROJMOVIC received her Ph.D. in art history from the University of Munich. She is the Director of the Centre for Jewish Studies, a lecturer in the School of Fine Art, and one of the deputy directors of the AHRB Centre for Cultural Analysis, Theory & History, all at the University of Leeds. She has published Hebraica and Judaica from the Cecil Roth Collection: decorated manuscripts and broadsheets in the Brotherton Library (1997) and Imagining the self, imagining the other: visual representation and Jewish-Christian dynamics in the Middle Ages and

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