Hearst over Hollywood: Power, Passion, and Propaganda in the Movies

By Louis Pizzitola | Go to book overview

Acknowledgements

Over the years, so many people were helpful to me in completing this book. Some knew Hearst, some knew one or more who were associated with Hearst, and some had done their own work in areas related to Hearst. Others simply responded to my interests with enthusiasm that went beyond perfunctory professional courtesies, and they took the extra step to point me in right direction. I will always be grateful for their willingness to share their time and their times.

Bruce Abrams of the Municipal Archives (NYC) Joe Adamson, Jana Allison, Jane Ardmore, Mike Barrier, Blaine Bartell of the UCLA Film Archives, Pat Culver Battle, Bill Berkson, Eleanor Lambert Berkson, Brigid Berlin, Edward Bernays, Linton von Beroldingen, Jean Willicombe Bissantz, the family of Alexander Black, Bill Blackbeard, Mary Carlisle Blakely, William Block, Patricia Bosworth, Sean Patrick Brady, Suzanne Brent, Roy Brewer, Ben Brewster of the Wisconsin Center for Film and Theater Research, Kevin Brownlow, John Canemaker, Jack Casserly, Igor Cassini, Larry Ceplair, Anthony Champagne, Michael Ciepley, Taylor Coffman, Robert Cole, Judy Coleman, Ned Comstock of USC, Mrs. Frank Conniff, Joseph V. Connolly Jr., Adrian Consentini, Tim Considine, Donald Crafton, Daniel Czitrom, Susan Darer, Luther Davis, Walter de Hoog, Harvey Deneroff, Martin Dies Jr., Bill Doyle, Angela Fox Dunn, Daniel Mark Epstein, Richard Fenton, Phil Frank of the Sausalito Historical Society, James Frasher, Tina Friedrich, Doris Gale, Dewitt Goddard, Mrs. Dean Goodsell, Milton Gould, Walter Gould, Lita Grey, Fred Guiles, Barbara Hall of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences Library, Michael Hall, Egon Hanfstaegl, Nils Hanson of the Ziegfeld Club, Charles Harris, Will Hays Jr., William Randolph Hearst Jr., Robert Herzstein, Joseph J. Hovish of the American

-xv-

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