Joaquin Murrieta: Life and Adventures of the Celebrated Bandit : His Exploits in the State of California

By Ireneo Paz; Francis P. Belle | Go to book overview

Chapter III

In the first days of the spring of 1852, Joaquin and his party went down from the mountains, taking with them about three hundred horses, stolen during the winter. They took them to the state of Sonora, crossing the southern part of California, and taking great care to travel only at night. There in Mexico they sold the horses.

Some weeks later the men returned to California, establishing their headquarters in a splendid place covered with forage and known as Arroyo Cantova. It was a valley seven or eight miles long, fertile, with water in abundance, and protected by a range of hills which had only one narrow pass in which a few determined men would be able to defend themselves against a colossal army. This rich and delightful valley was situated between the Tejon and Pacheco Passes east of the great range of mountains and west of Tulare Lake. From its topographical position the place was suitable for a retreat inasmuch as there was not a single habitation for fifty miles around it. Game was very abundant there; bear, elk, antelope, deer, quail, wild turkey and many small animals seemed to be placed there for the express purpose of feeding mankind. The location which Joaquin and his gang selected for making their camp could not have been more suitable.

In the center of a group of dense oak trees, always green, Joaquin fixed his dwelling. The bandit chief was often seen reclining in the fine grass with which nature had adorned that pleasant valley, at his side a beautiful and winsome young girl whom he had won in Sonora, when he and his band of outlaws went there to sell their stolen horses.

Clarita, as the graceful girl was called, was a daughter of Don Sebastian Valero, a Spanish grandee, who after having lost his fortune extravagantly, had retired to Mexico with a small capital and had bought a piece of land adjoining the ranch of Joaquin’s father. The first time that Joaquin and Clarita saw each other, she was only ten years old, and Joaquin was thirteen. Nevertheless, with her fem

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Joaquin Murrieta: Life and Adventures of the Celebrated Bandit : His Exploits in the State of California
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Table of Contents vii
  • Introduction ix
  • I - The Historical Joaquín xii
  • II - Biography xviii
  • III - Translation and Plagiarism of Ridge's Work xxv
  • IV - Joaquín Murrieta as Myth xxxvii
  • V - Joaquín Murrieta in Narrative Fiction xlviii
  • VI - Joaquín Murrieta in Poetry lix
  • VII - Joaquín Murrieta in Theater and Film lxviii
  • VIII - The Corrido of Joaquín Murrieta lxxviii
  • IX - This Edition xcvi
  • Notes xcviii
  • Bibliography cii
  • Chronology cxii
  • Chapter I 1
  • Chapter II 7
  • Chapter III 13
  • Chapter IV 18
  • Chapter V 22
  • Chapter VI 29
  • Chapter VII 35
  • Chapter VIII 43
  • Chapter IX 48
  • Chapter X 54
  • Chapter XI 61
  • Chapter XII 65
  • Chapter XIII 69
  • Chapter XIV 72
  • Chapter XV 76
  • Chapter XVI 80
  • Chapter XVII 86
  • Chapter XVIII 90
  • Chapter XIX 94
  • Chapter XX 99
  • Chapter XXI 107
  • Chapter XXII 113
  • Chapter XXIII 118
  • Chapter XXIV 123
  • Chapter XXV 128
  • Chapter XXVI 135
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